LSE: Public lectures and eventshttp://www.tigerscanswim.com/newsAndMedia/videoAndAudio/channels/publicLecturesAndEvents/The London School of Economics and Political Science public events podcast series is a platform for thought, ideas and lively debate where you can hear from some of the world's leading thinkers. Listen to more than 200 new episodes every year.The London School of Economics and Political Science public events podcast series is a platform for thought, ideas and lively debate where you can hear from some of the world's leading thinkers. Listen to more than 200 new episodes every year.comms.filmandaudio@lse.ac.uk (LSE Film and Audio Team)LSE Film and Audio Teamcomms.filmandaudio@lse.ac.ukcomms.filmandaudio@lse.ac.uk (LSE Film and Audio Team)en-ukCopyright ? Terms of use apply see http://www.tigerscanswim.com/termsOfUse/Social SciencenoLondon School of Economics and Political ScienceNoSQL Serverhttp://www.tigerscanswim.com/assets/richmedia/webFeedImages/publicLectures_generic_144.jpg LSE: Public lectures and eventshttp://www.tigerscanswim.com/newsAndMedia/videoAndAudio/channels/publicLecturesAndEvents/144144Wed, 26 Jun 2019 16:43:00 GMTWed, 26 Jun 2019 16:43:00 GMT Global Health and Inequality [Audio]Professor Sudhir Anand, Professor Amartya Senhttp://www.tigerscanswim.com/newsAndMedia/videoAndAudio/channels/publicLecturesAndEvents/player.aspx?id=471201:30:09PD7359Speaker(s): Professor Sudhir Anand, Professor Amartya Sen | To ensure that people live long and healthy lives it is important to know what kills different groups of people in different places. The Global Burden of Disease (GBD) based on the Disability-Adjusted Life Year has been developed to do this. This lecture shows how this measure leads to various anomalies and biases, in particular it underestimates the health problems experienced by women and children. Sudhir Anand is Research Director of Global Equity Initiative at Harvard University and Centennial Professor at the International Inequalities Institute, LSE. Amartya Sen is Thomas W Lamont University Professor and Professor of Economics and Philosophy at Harvard University and an LSE Honorary Fellow. Mike Savage (@MikeSav47032563) is Director of the International Inequalities Institute and Martin White Professor of Sociology at LSE. The International Inequalities Institute (@LSEInequalities) at LSE brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead cutting-edge research focused on understanding why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges. The Eva Colorni Memorial Trust was established by Amartya Sen to commemorate the life and work of Eva Colorni and to reflect and further her belief in the possibility of social justice. Eva was an excellent teacher and writer whose work and passion were concerned with analysing and redressing inequality. The main activities of the Trust are to award bursaries to undergraduate students of economics who are experiencing hardship at London Metropolitan University, where Eva taught for many years, and to hold lectures on the theme of social justice. The first five lectures were published in a book, called Living As Equals and includes an essay by Amartya Sen on "Social Commitment and Democracy”. There is more information about the Trust and past lectures on the Eva Colorni Memorial Trust website. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEEvaColorniSpeaker(s): Professor Sudhir Anand, Professor Amartya Sen | To ensure that people live long and healthy lives it is important to know what kills different groups of people in different places. The Global Burden of Disease (GBD) based on the Disability-Adjusted Life Year has been developed to do this. This lecture shows how this measure leads to various anomalies and biases, in particular it underestimates the health problems experienced by women and children. Sudhir Anand is Research Director of Global Equity Initiative at Harvard University and Centennial Professor at the International Inequalities Institute, LSE. Amartya Sen is Thomas W Lamont University Professor and Professor of Economics and Philosophy at Harvard University and an LSE Honorary Fellow. Mike Savage (@MikeSav47032563) is Director of the International Inequalities Institute and Martin White Professor of Sociology at LSE. The International Inequalities Institute (@LSEInequalities) at LSE brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead cutting-edge research focused on understanding why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges. The Eva Colorni Memorial Trust was established by Amartya Sen to commemorate the life and work of Eva Colorni and to reflect and further her belief in the possibility of social justice. Eva was an excellent teacher and writer whose work and passion were concerned with analysing and redressing inequality. The main activities of the Trust are to award bursaries to undergraduate students of economics who are experiencing hardship at London Metropolitan University, where Eva taught for many years, and to hold lectures on the theme of social justice. The first five lectures were published in a book, called Living As Equals and includes an essay by Amartya Sen on "Social Commitment and Democracy”. There is more information about the Trust and past lectures on the Eva Colorni Memorial Trust website. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEEvaColorniTue, 18 Jun 2019 18:30:00 GMT1 The Problem of Modernity: reinterpreting decolonisation and the modern? [Audio]Amit Chaudhurihttp://www.tigerscanswim.com/newsAndMedia/videoAndAudio/channels/publicLecturesAndEvents/player.aspx?id=470801:24:51PD7355Speaker(s): Amit Chaudhuri | How might the modern, rather than the human, be recovered as a way of looking at a common inheritance? And why is modernity resistant to being recovered? Amit Chaudhuri (@AmitChaudhuri) is an essayist, literary critic and the author of seven novels. Robin Archer is the Director of the Ralph Miliband Programme, LSE. The Ralph Miliband Programme (@RMilibandLSE) is one of LSE's most prestigious lecture series and seeks to advance Ralph Miliband's spirit of free social inquiry.Speaker(s): Amit Chaudhuri | How might the modern, rather than the human, be recovered as a way of looking at a common inheritance? And why is modernity resistant to being recovered? Amit Chaudhuri (@AmitChaudhuri) is an essayist, literary critic and the author of seven novels. Robin Archer is the Director of the Ralph Miliband Programme, LSE. The Ralph Miliband Programme (@RMilibandLSE) is one of LSE's most prestigious lecture series and seeks to advance Ralph Miliband's spirit of free social inquiry.Thu, 6 Jun 2019 18:30:00 GMT2 An Unexpected Convergence: informality, the gig-economy, and digital platforms [Audio]Professor Pinelopi Koujianou Goldberghttp://www.tigerscanswim.com/newsAndMedia/videoAndAudio/channels/publicLecturesAndEvents/player.aspx?id=470701:30:32PD7354Speaker(s): Professor Pinelopi Koujianou Goldberg | The Annual Economica Coase lecture is jointly sponsored by the journal Economica and the Department of Economics. Pinelopi Koujianou Goldberg is Elihu Professor of Economics at Yale University and Chief Economist of the World Bank Group. She is former Vice-President of the American Economic Association and President elect of the Econometric Society (for 2021). She is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a recipient of both Guggenheim Memorial Foundation and Sloan Research Fellowships, and recipient of the Bodossaki Prize in Social Sciences. She is also a research associate at the National Bureau of Economics Research (NBER – currently on leave) and board member of the Bureau of Research and Economic Analysis of Development (BREAD). From 2011-2017 she was Editor-in-Chief of the American Economic Review. She has published widely in the areas of applied microeconomics, international trade, development, and industrial organization. She holds a Ph.D. from Stanford University and a Diplom from the University of Freiburg, Germany. Oriana Bandiera (@orianabandiera) is a Professor of Economics, Sir Anthony Atkinson Chair in Economics and Director of STICERD. The Department of Economics (@LSEEcon) at the LSE is one of the leading economics departments in the world. We are a large department, ensuring all mainstream areas of economics are strongly represented in research and teaching. Economica (@EconomicaLSE) is an international peer-reviewed academic journal, covering research in all branches of economics. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECoaseSpeaker(s): Professor Pinelopi Koujianou Goldberg | The Annual Economica Coase lecture is jointly sponsored by the journal Economica and the Department of Economics. Pinelopi Koujianou Goldberg is Elihu Professor of Economics at Yale University and Chief Economist of the World Bank Group. She is former Vice-President of the American Economic Association and President elect of the Econometric Society (for 2021). She is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a recipient of both Guggenheim Memorial Foundation and Sloan Research Fellowships, and recipient of the Bodossaki Prize in Social Sciences. She is also a research associate at the National Bureau of Economics Research (NBER – currently on leave) and board member of the Bureau of Research and Economic Analysis of Development (BREAD). From 2011-2017 she was Editor-in-Chief of the American Economic Review. She has published widely in the areas of applied microeconomics, international trade, development, and industrial organization. She holds a Ph.D. from Stanford University and a Diplom from the University of Freiburg, Germany. Oriana Bandiera (@orianabandiera) is a Professor of Economics, Sir Anthony Atkinson Chair in Economics and Director of STICERD. The Department of Economics (@LSEEcon) at the LSE is one of the leading economics departments in the world. We are a large department, ensuring all mainstream areas of economics are strongly represented in research and teaching. Economica (@EconomicaLSE) is an international peer-reviewed academic journal, covering research in all branches of economics. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECoaseTue, 4 Jun 2019 18:30:00 GMT3 Molyneux's Problem [Audio]Dr Marjolein Degenaar, Barry Ginley, Dr Brian Glenneyhttp://www.tigerscanswim.com/newsAndMedia/videoAndAudio/channels/publicLecturesAndEvents/player.aspx?id=470601:22:35PD7353Speaker(s): Dr Marjolein Degenaar, Barry Ginley, Dr Brian Glenney | William Molyneux posed the following question: Consider a person who has been born blind and who has learnt to distinguish a globe and a cube by touch. If this person could suddenly see, would they be able to distinguish these objects by sight alone? This seventeenth-century thought experiment, known as ‘Molyneux’s problem’, received attention from some of philosophy’s greatest minds. We discuss how thinkers like Locke and Leibniz, as well as artists with visual impairments, responded to Molyneux’s challenge. Marjolein Degenaar is the author of Molyneux’s Problem: Three Centuries of Discussion on the Perception of Form. Barry Ginley is Equality and Access Adviser, Victoria & Albert Museum. Brian Glenney is Assistant Professor of Philosophy, Norwich University. Clare Moriarty (@quiteclare) is a Fellow, Forum for Philosophy and a Teaching Fellow in Philosophy, UCD The Forum for European Philosophy (@ForumPhilosophy) is an educational charity that organises a full and varied programme of philosophy and interdisciplinary events in the UK. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEForumSpeaker(s): Dr Marjolein Degenaar, Barry Ginley, Dr Brian Glenney | William Molyneux posed the following question: Consider a person who has been born blind and who has learnt to distinguish a globe and a cube by touch. If this person could suddenly see, would they be able to distinguish these objects by sight alone? This seventeenth-century thought experiment, known as ‘Molyneux’s problem’, received attention from some of philosophy’s greatest minds. We discuss how thinkers like Locke and Leibniz, as well as artists with visual impairments, responded to Molyneux’s challenge. Marjolein Degenaar is the author of Molyneux’s Problem: Three Centuries of Discussion on the Perception of Form. Barry Ginley is Equality and Access Adviser, Victoria & Albert Museum. Brian Glenney is Assistant Professor of Philosophy, Norwich University. Clare Moriarty (@quiteclare) is a Fellow, Forum for Philosophy and a Teaching Fellow in Philosophy, UCD The Forum for European Philosophy (@ForumPhilosophy) is an educational charity that organises a full and varied programme of philosophy and interdisciplinary events in the UK. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEForumMon, 3 Jun 2019 18:30:00 GMT4 Anti-System Politics in Europe: the crisis of market liberalism in rich democracies [Audio]Dr Jonathan Hopkinhttp://www.tigerscanswim.com/newsAndMedia/videoAndAudio/channels/publicLecturesAndEvents/player.aspx?id=470501:27:14PD7352Speaker(s): Dr Jonathan Hopkin | At this year’s Annual Lecture, which marks the 10th anniversary of LEQS and follows just days after this year’s European parliamentary elections, Jonathan Hopkin will discuss the recent ruptures in the politics of the rich democracies, signalled by electoral instability across Europe, as well as dramatic events like the election of Donald Trump to the US Presidency and the United Kingdom’s vote to leave the European Union. Dr Hopkin argues that these tumultuous political developments are a consequence of a longer-term crisis of market liberalism, resulting from the abandonment of the post-war model of egalitarian capitalism in the 1970s. This shift in politics entailed weakening the democratic process in favor of an opaque, technocratic form of governance that allows voters little opportunity to influence policy. With the financial crisis of the late 2000s, these arrangements became unsustainable, as incumbent politicians were unable to provide solutions to economic hardship. Electorates demanded change, and it had to come from outside the system. Jonathan Hopkin (@jrhopkin) is Associate Professor of Comparative Politics in the Department of Government at LSE. Miriam Sorace (@MiriamSorace) is an LSE Fellow in EU Politics at LSE’s European Institute. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. The LSE 'Europe in Question' Discussion Paper Series (@leqsLSE) was established in May 2009 to publish high quality research on Europe and the European Union from scholars across LSE and beyond. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEEuropeSpeaker(s): Dr Jonathan Hopkin | At this year’s Annual Lecture, which marks the 10th anniversary of LEQS and follows just days after this year’s European parliamentary elections, Jonathan Hopkin will discuss the recent ruptures in the politics of the rich democracies, signalled by electoral instability across Europe, as well as dramatic events like the election of Donald Trump to the US Presidency and the United Kingdom’s vote to leave the European Union. Dr Hopkin argues that these tumultuous political developments are a consequence of a longer-term crisis of market liberalism, resulting from the abandonment of the post-war model of egalitarian capitalism in the 1970s. This shift in politics entailed weakening the democratic process in favor of an opaque, technocratic form of governance that allows voters little opportunity to influence policy. With the financial crisis of the late 2000s, these arrangements became unsustainable, as incumbent politicians were unable to provide solutions to economic hardship. Electorates demanded change, and it had to come from outside the system. Jonathan Hopkin (@jrhopkin) is Associate Professor of Comparative Politics in the Department of Government at LSE. Miriam Sorace (@MiriamSorace) is an LSE Fellow in EU Politics at LSE’s European Institute. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. The LSE 'Europe in Question' Discussion Paper Series (@leqsLSE) was established in May 2009 to publish high quality research on Europe and the European Union from scholars across LSE and beyond. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEEuropeThu, 30 May 2019 18:30:00 GMT5 Replication Crisis? [Audio]Professor Alexander Bird, Dr Laura Fortunato, Professor Marcus Munafòhttp://www.tigerscanswim.com/newsAndMedia/videoAndAudio/channels/publicLecturesAndEvents/player.aspx?id=470301:28:07PD7350Speaker(s): Professor Alexander Bird, Dr Laura Fortunato, Professor Marcus Munafò | The hallmark of good science is often supposed to be experiments that produce the same results when repeated. But over the last number of years, scientists have replicated a number of established, high-profile experiments and produced different results. Does it point to serious flaws and biases in the sciences? Or is it evidence of the power of science to self-correct? And what can be done to make science more replicable? We explore whether the replication crisis undermines our trust in science. Alexander Bird is Peter Sowerby Professor of Philosophy and Medicine, KCL. Laura Fortunato is Associate Professor of Evolutionary Anthropology, University of Oxford. Marcus Munafò is Professor of Biological Psychology, University of Bristol. Jonathan Birch is a Fellow at the Forum for Philosophy and Associate Professor of Philosophy, LSE. The Forum for European Philosophy (@ForumPhilosophy) is an educational charity that organises a full and varied programme of philosophy and interdisciplinary events in the UK. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEForumSpeaker(s): Professor Alexander Bird, Dr Laura Fortunato, Professor Marcus Munafò | The hallmark of good science is often supposed to be experiments that produce the same results when repeated. But over the last number of years, scientists have replicated a number of established, high-profile experiments and produced different results. Does it point to serious flaws and biases in the sciences? Or is it evidence of the power of science to self-correct? And what can be done to make science more replicable? We explore whether the replication crisis undermines our trust in science. Alexander Bird is Peter Sowerby Professor of Philosophy and Medicine, KCL. Laura Fortunato is Associate Professor of Evolutionary Anthropology, University of Oxford. Marcus Munafò is Professor of Biological Psychology, University of Bristol. Jonathan Birch is a Fellow at the Forum for Philosophy and Associate Professor of Philosophy, LSE. The Forum for European Philosophy (@ForumPhilosophy) is an educational charity that organises a full and varied programme of philosophy and interdisciplinary events in the UK. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEForumTue, 28 May 2019 18:30:00 GMT6 State-like and State-dislike in the Anthropological Margins [Audio]Dr Judith Scheelehttp://www.tigerscanswim.com/newsAndMedia/videoAndAudio/channels/publicLecturesAndEvents/player.aspx?id=470400:56:30PD7351Speaker(s): Dr Judith Scheele | This lecture argues for a return to the study of political institutions in so-called “stateless societies”. Judith Scheele is Directrice d’études, école des hautes études en sciences sociales, France. Deborah James (@djameslse) is Professor in the Department of Anthropology at LSE. This event is the Malinowski Memorial Lecture 2019. Anthropology (@LSEAnthropology) is the comparative study of culture and society. We ask big questions about what we have in common, and what makes us different. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEMalinowskiSpeaker(s): Dr Judith Scheele | This lecture argues for a return to the study of political institutions in so-called “stateless societies”. Judith Scheele is Directrice d’études, école des hautes études en sciences sociales, France. Deborah James (@djameslse) is Professor in the Department of Anthropology at LSE. This event is the Malinowski Memorial Lecture 2019. Anthropology (@LSEAnthropology) is the comparative study of culture and society. We ask big questions about what we have in common, and what makes us different. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEMalinowskiThu, 23 May 2019 18:30:00 GMT7 Rethinking Human Rights: a southern response to western critics [Audio]Muthoni Wanyekihttp://www.tigerscanswim.com/newsAndMedia/videoAndAudio/channels/publicLecturesAndEvents/player.aspx?id=469301:23:59PD7340Speaker(s): Muthoni Wanyeki | In this lecture, Muthoni Wanyeki will draw on three decades of human rights activism with Kenyan, African and international organisations to push back against the western critique of human rights and to formulate her own assessment of the strengths and weaknesses of the human rights movement in Africa and the global south. Muthoni Wanyeki is Regional Director of Open Society’s Africa Regional Office. Bronwen Manby (@BronwenManby) is a Visiting Fellow with LSE Human Rights and is an independent consultant in the field of human rights, democracy and good governance, with a focus on sub-Saharan Africa. Bronwen is also a Principal Investigator at the LSE Middle East Centre. Based in the Department of Sociology (@LSEsociology), LSE Human Rights @LSEHumanRights) is a trans-disciplinary centre of excellence for international academic research, teaching and critical scholarship on human rights. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEHumanRightsSpeaker(s): Muthoni Wanyeki | In this lecture, Muthoni Wanyeki will draw on three decades of human rights activism with Kenyan, African and international organisations to push back against the western critique of human rights and to formulate her own assessment of the strengths and weaknesses of the human rights movement in Africa and the global south. Muthoni Wanyeki is Regional Director of Open Society’s Africa Regional Office. Bronwen Manby (@BronwenManby) is a Visiting Fellow with LSE Human Rights and is an independent consultant in the field of human rights, democracy and good governance, with a focus on sub-Saharan Africa. Bronwen is also a Principal Investigator at the LSE Middle East Centre. Based in the Department of Sociology (@LSEsociology), LSE Human Rights @LSEHumanRights) is a trans-disciplinary centre of excellence for international academic research, teaching and critical scholarship on human rights. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEHumanRightsWed, 22 May 2019 18:30:00 GMT8 Where Will Future Jobs and Growth Come From? Where Will Future Jobs and Growth Come From? [Audio]Professor John Van Reenenhttp://www.tigerscanswim.com/newsAndMedia/videoAndAudio/channels/publicLecturesAndEvents/player.aspx?id=469201:30:33PD7339Speaker(s): Professor John Van Reenen | John Van Reenen will discuss the impact of new technologies on jobs, wages and skills, and will assess how this impact will depend on the choices we make now as citizens, managers and voters. John Van Reenen (@johnvanreenen) is Gordon Y. Billiard Professor of Management and Economics at MIT, and BP Professor of Economics at the LSE. Steve Pischke is Head of the Department of Economics at LSE. The Department of Economics (@LSEEcon) at the LSE is one of the leading economics departments in the world. We are a large department, ensuring all mainstream areas of economics are strongly represented in research and teaching. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEFutureJobsSpeaker(s): Professor John Van Reenen | John Van Reenen will discuss the impact of new technologies on jobs, wages and skills, and will assess how this impact will depend on the choices we make now as citizens, managers and voters. John Van Reenen (@johnvanreenen) is Gordon Y. Billiard Professor of Management and Economics at MIT, and BP Professor of Economics at the LSE. Steve Pischke is Head of the Department of Economics at LSE. The Department of Economics (@LSEEcon) at the LSE is one of the leading economics departments in the world. We are a large department, ensuring all mainstream areas of economics are strongly represented in research and teaching. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEFutureJobsWed, 22 May 2019 18:30:00 GMT9 Revolution Fran?aise: Emmanuel Macron and the quest to reinvent a nation [Audio]Sophie Pedderhttp://www.tigerscanswim.com/newsAndMedia/videoAndAudio/channels/publicLecturesAndEvents/player.aspx?id=469101:24:52PD7338Speaker(s): Sophie Pedder | Two years after Emmanuel Macron came from nowhere to seize the French presidency, Sophie Pedder, The Economist’s Paris bureau chief, tells the story of his remarkable rise and time in office so far. In this updated edition, published with a new foreword, Pedder revisits her analysis of Macron’s troubles and triumphs in the light of the gilets jaunes protests. Sophie Pedder (@PedderSophie) is an award-winning journalist and the Paris Bureau Chief of The Economist since 2003. Iain Begg (@IainBeggLSE) is Professorial Research Fellow at the European Institute and Co-Director of the Dahrendorf Forum, LSE. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEFranceSpeaker(s): Sophie Pedder | Two years after Emmanuel Macron came from nowhere to seize the French presidency, Sophie Pedder, The Economist’s Paris bureau chief, tells the story of his remarkable rise and time in office so far. In this updated edition, published with a new foreword, Pedder revisits her analysis of Macron’s troubles and triumphs in the light of the gilets jaunes protests. Sophie Pedder (@PedderSophie) is an award-winning journalist and the Paris Bureau Chief of The Economist since 2003. Iain Begg (@IainBeggLSE) is Professorial Research Fellow at the European Institute and Co-Director of the Dahrendorf Forum, LSE. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEFranceTue, 21 May 2019 18:30:00 GMT10 Internationale Blues: revolutionary pessimism and the politics of solidarity [Audio]Professor Robin D G Kelleyhttp://www.tigerscanswim.com/newsAndMedia/videoAndAudio/channels/publicLecturesAndEvents/player.aspx?id=470101:40:57PD7348Speaker(s): Professor Robin D G Kelley | In the context of Afro-pessimism, this lecture will imagine "the Internationale," that great song of international solidarity and revolution transcending the nation, as a blues. Robin D G Kelley is Gary B Nash Endowed Chair in US History, University of California, Los Angeles. Ay?a ?ubuk?u (@ayca_cu) is Associate Professor in Human Rights, Department of Sociology, LSE, and Co-Director of LSE Human Rights. This event is the annual lecture of the Internationalism, Cosmopolitanism and the Politics of Solidarity (ICPS) research group at LSE. LSE Human Rights (@LSEHumanRights) is a trans-disciplinary centre of excellence for international academic research, teaching and critical scholarship on human rights Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSESolidaritySpeaker(s): Professor Robin D G Kelley | In the context of Afro-pessimism, this lecture will imagine "the Internationale," that great song of international solidarity and revolution transcending the nation, as a blues. Robin D G Kelley is Gary B Nash Endowed Chair in US History, University of California, Los Angeles. Ay?a ?ubuk?u (@ayca_cu) is Associate Professor in Human Rights, Department of Sociology, LSE, and Co-Director of LSE Human Rights. This event is the annual lecture of the Internationalism, Cosmopolitanism and the Politics of Solidarity (ICPS) research group at LSE. LSE Human Rights (@LSEHumanRights) is a trans-disciplinary centre of excellence for international academic research, teaching and critical scholarship on human rights Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSESolidarityFri, 17 May 2019 18:30:00 GMT11 What Might the European Elections Mean for the Future of the EU? [Audio]Professor Matthew Goodwin, Dr Sara Hagemann, Professor Sara Hobolthttp://www.tigerscanswim.com/newsAndMedia/videoAndAudio/channels/publicLecturesAndEvents/player.aspx?id=469001:30:19PD7328Speaker(s): Professor Matthew Goodwin, Dr Sara Hagemann, Professor Sara Hobolt | In this especially timely occasion, the panel will consider the impact of the upcoming European elections on the EU as a negotiating actor of Brexit and the future relationship with the UK. Will the balance of power change in the EU institutions? Is this the next stop for the populist wave, after Brexit? Matthew Goodwin (@GoodwinMJ) is Professor of Politics and International Relations, University of Kent. Sara Hagemann (@sarahagemann) is Associate Professor in European Politics, European Institute, LSE. Sara Hobolt (@sarahobolt) is Sutherland Chair in European Institutions and Professor in the Department of Government, LSE. Andrés Velasco (@AndresVelasco) is the inaugural Dean of LSE's School of Public Policy. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. The School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) equips you with the skills and ideas to transform people and societies. We are an international community where ideas and practice meet. Our approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance.Speaker(s): Professor Matthew Goodwin, Dr Sara Hagemann, Professor Sara Hobolt | In this especially timely occasion, the panel will consider the impact of the upcoming European elections on the EU as a negotiating actor of Brexit and the future relationship with the UK. Will the balance of power change in the EU institutions? Is this the next stop for the populist wave, after Brexit? Matthew Goodwin (@GoodwinMJ) is Professor of Politics and International Relations, University of Kent. Sara Hagemann (@sarahagemann) is Associate Professor in European Politics, European Institute, LSE. Sara Hobolt (@sarahobolt) is Sutherland Chair in European Institutions and Professor in the Department of Government, LSE. Andrés Velasco (@AndresVelasco) is the inaugural Dean of LSE's School of Public Policy. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. The School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) equips you with the skills and ideas to transform people and societies. We are an international community where ideas and practice meet. Our approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance.Thu, 16 May 2019 18:30:00 GMT12 On Strike On Strike [Audio]Dr Jo Grady, Dr Martin O'Neill, Dr Waseem Yaqoobhttp://www.tigerscanswim.com/newsAndMedia/videoAndAudio/channels/publicLecturesAndEvents/player.aspx?id=468801:31:23PD7326Speaker(s): Dr Jo Grady, Dr Martin O'Neill, Dr Waseem Yaqoob | Workers of the world, unite! We discuss the history, politics, and ethics of strikes, and their place in the labour movement. Why do they happen and what makes for a successful strike? What justifies workers in withdrawing their labour to push bosses for improved pay and conditions? And will this event be cancelled due to strike action?! Jo Grady is a Senior Lecturer in Employment Relations, University of Sheffield. Martin O'Neill is a Senior Lecturer in Philosophy, University of York. Waseem Yaqoob is a Lecturer in the History of Modern Political Thought, University of Cambridge. Sarah Fine is a Fellow at the Forum for Philosophy and a Senior Lecturer in Philosophy at KCL. The Forum for European Philosophy (@ForumPhilosophy) is an educational charity that organises a full and varied programme of philosophy and interdisciplinary events in the UK.Speaker(s): Dr Jo Grady, Dr Martin O'Neill, Dr Waseem Yaqoob | Workers of the world, unite! We discuss the history, politics, and ethics of strikes, and their place in the labour movement. Why do they happen and what makes for a successful strike? What justifies workers in withdrawing their labour to push bosses for improved pay and conditions? And will this event be cancelled due to strike action?! Jo Grady is a Senior Lecturer in Employment Relations, University of Sheffield. Martin O'Neill is a Senior Lecturer in Philosophy, University of York. Waseem Yaqoob is a Lecturer in the History of Modern Political Thought, University of Cambridge. Sarah Fine is a Fellow at the Forum for Philosophy and a Senior Lecturer in Philosophy at KCL. The Forum for European Philosophy (@ForumPhilosophy) is an educational charity that organises a full and varied programme of philosophy and interdisciplinary events in the UK.Tue, 14 May 2019 18:30:00 GMT13 Clear Bright Future: a radical defence of the human being [Audio]Paul Masonhttp://www.tigerscanswim.com/newsAndMedia/videoAndAudio/channels/publicLecturesAndEvents/player.aspx?id=468701:27:19PD7325Speaker(s): Paul Mason | We face a triple threat: authoritarian politicians, the possibility of intelligent machines and a secular fatalism and irrationality. But they can all be fought. Paul Mason explains how. Paul Mason (@paulmasonnews) is a British commentator, journalist and author. This event marks the publication of Paul's new book, Clear Bright Future: A Radical Defence of the Human Being. In the 1980s Paul worked as a special needs teacher, a theatre musical director and university lecturer before switching to journalism in the early 1990s. He was deputy editor of Computer Weekly during the dotcom boom and joined BBC Newsnight in 2001. ?He worked as economics editor on Newsnight, switching to Channel 4 News in 2013. During fifteen years as a public service broadcaster he covered stories as varied as Hurricane Katrina, the collapse of Lehman Brothers, Occupy and the Arab Spring. Plus the Greek crisis, the Taksim Square revolt and the 2014 Gaza war. He won the RTS Specialist Reporter Award in 2012 and was the inaugural winner of the Ellen Meiksins Wood prize in 2018. The Ralph Miliband Programme (@RMilibandLSE) is one of LSE's most prestigious lecture series and seeks to advance Ralph Miliband's spirit of free social inquiry.Speaker(s): Paul Mason | We face a triple threat: authoritarian politicians, the possibility of intelligent machines and a secular fatalism and irrationality. But they can all be fought. Paul Mason explains how. Paul Mason (@paulmasonnews) is a British commentator, journalist and author. This event marks the publication of Paul's new book, Clear Bright Future: A Radical Defence of the Human Being. In the 1980s Paul worked as a special needs teacher, a theatre musical director and university lecturer before switching to journalism in the early 1990s. He was deputy editor of Computer Weekly during the dotcom boom and joined BBC Newsnight in 2001. ?He worked as economics editor on Newsnight, switching to Channel 4 News in 2013. During fifteen years as a public service broadcaster he covered stories as varied as Hurricane Katrina, the collapse of Lehman Brothers, Occupy and the Arab Spring. Plus the Greek crisis, the Taksim Square revolt and the 2014 Gaza war. He won the RTS Specialist Reporter Award in 2012 and was the inaugural winner of the Ellen Meiksins Wood prize in 2018. The Ralph Miliband Programme (@RMilibandLSE) is one of LSE's most prestigious lecture series and seeks to advance Ralph Miliband's spirit of free social inquiry.Mon, 13 May 2019 18:30:00 GMT14 The Global Distribution of Income and the Politics of Globalisation - embedded liberal capitalism [Audio]Dr María Ana Lugo, Professor Branko Milanovic, Dr Paul Segalhttp://www.tigerscanswim.com/newsAndMedia/videoAndAudio/channels/publicLecturesAndEvents/player.aspx?id=468601:29:29PD7324Speaker(s): Dr María Ana Lugo, Professor Branko Milanovic, Dr Paul Segal | The panel discuss the evolution of the global distribution of income and political implications, highlighting endogenous forces of rising inequality in liberal capitalism embedded in globalisation. The last quarter century of globalisation has witnessed the largest reshuffle of global incomes since the Industrial Revolution. The global Gini index declined by about 2 points over the twenty-five year period 1988-2013, while within the global distribution of income three changes stand out. First, China has graduated from the bottom ranks, creating an important global “middle” class that has transformed a twin-peaked 1988 global distribution into the single-peaked distribution we observe today. The main “winners” were country-deciles that in 1988 were around the median of the global income distribution, 90% of them representing people in Asia. Second, the “losers” were the country-deciles that in 1988 were around the 85th percentile of the global income distribution, almost 90% of them representing people in OECD economies. Third, the global top 1% was another “winner” whose incomes rose substantially. These three changes open up the following three political issues. In the developing world the big question is how to manage the rising expectations of meaningful political participation in emerging countries like China. In the rich countries, it is how to "placate" the relative losers of the last 30 years so that they do not turn away from globalisation and towards populist anti-immigrant policies. Cutting across all countries, and directly implicated in both of these questions, is how to constraint the rising economic and political power of the global elite. The increasing gap between the Western “top 1 percenters” and the middle classes that is at the origin of many of recent political developments may not be a temporary glitch, but may be driven by endogenous forces of rising inequality in systems of liberal capitalism embedded in globalisation. María Ana Lugo (@MariaAnaLugo) is a senior economist at the Poverty and Equity Global Practice at the World Bank and a council member of the Society for the Study of Economic Inequality (ECINEQ). Branko Milanovic (@BrankoMilan) is Visiting Presidential Professor and LIS Senior Scholar at the Graduate Center, City University of New York. Paul Segal (@pdsegal) is Senior Lecturer in Economics, Department of International Development, Kings College London and Visiting Senior Fellow, International Inequalities Institute, LSE. David Soskice is School Professor of Political Science and Economics at the LSE. The International Inequalities Institute (@LSEInequalities) at LSE brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead cutting-edge research focused on understanding why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges.Speaker(s): Dr María Ana Lugo, Professor Branko Milanovic, Dr Paul Segal | The panel discuss the evolution of the global distribution of income and political implications, highlighting endogenous forces of rising inequality in liberal capitalism embedded in globalisation. The last quarter century of globalisation has witnessed the largest reshuffle of global incomes since the Industrial Revolution. The global Gini index declined by about 2 points over the twenty-five year period 1988-2013, while within the global distribution of income three changes stand out. First, China has graduated from the bottom ranks, creating an important global “middle” class that has transformed a twin-peaked 1988 global distribution into the single-peaked distribution we observe today. The main “winners” were country-deciles that in 1988 were around the median of the global income distribution, 90% of them representing people in Asia. Second, the “losers” were the country-deciles that in 1988 were around the 85th percentile of the global income distribution, almost 90% of them representing people in OECD economies. Third, the global top 1% was another “winner” whose incomes rose substantially. These three changes open up the following three political issues. In the developing world the big question is how to manage the rising expectations of meaningful political participation in emerging countries like China. In the rich countries, it is how to "placate" the relative losers of the last 30 years so that they do not turn away from globalisation and towards populist anti-immigrant policies. Cutting across all countries, and directly implicated in both of these questions, is how to constraint the rising economic and political power of the global elite. The increasing gap between the Western “top 1 percenters” and the middle classes that is at the origin of many of recent political developments may not be a temporary glitch, but may be driven by endogenous forces of rising inequality in systems of liberal capitalism embedded in globalisation. María Ana Lugo (@MariaAnaLugo) is a senior economist at the Poverty and Equity Global Practice at the World Bank and a council member of the Society for the Study of Economic Inequality (ECINEQ). Branko Milanovic (@BrankoMilan) is Visiting Presidential Professor and LIS Senior Scholar at the Graduate Center, City University of New York. Paul Segal (@pdsegal) is Senior Lecturer in Economics, Department of International Development, Kings College London and Visiting Senior Fellow, International Inequalities Institute, LSE. David Soskice is School Professor of Political Science and Economics at the LSE. The International Inequalities Institute (@LSEInequalities) at LSE brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead cutting-edge research focused on understanding why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges.Fri, 10 May 2019 18:30:00 GMT15 From the 'End of History' to the Crisis of the Liberal Order: rethinking the end of the Cold War [Audio]Professor John Ikenberry, Professor Mary Kaldor, Professor Peter Trubowitz, Professor Vladislav Zubokhttp://www.tigerscanswim.com/newsAndMedia/videoAndAudio/channels/publicLecturesAndEvents/player.aspx?id=468401:23:42PD7322Speaker(s): Professor John Ikenberry, Professor Mary Kaldor, Professor Peter Trubowitz, Professor Vladislav Zubok | How and why has the liberal promise of the post-Cold War world not been realised? Where is the world now heading? Is the post-Cold War era over? In 1989 the Cold War ended. American pundit, Francis Fukuyama, confidently announced the end of history with the complete victory of liberalism word-wide. Globalisation and democracy represented the wave of the future. But thirty year later the tide of history appears to have turned. Fukuyama now talks bleakly of the crisis of democracy and the possible demise of the liberal order. Book after book proclaims the return of a 'new' Cold War between Russia, China and the West. And globalisation itself is in question. John Ikenberry is Albert G Milbank Professor of Politics and International Affairs, Princeton University. Mary Kaldor is Director of the Conflict and Civil Society Research Unit, Department of International Development, LSE. Peter Trubowitz (@ptrubowitz) is Head of the Department of International Relations and Director of the US Centre at LSE. Vladislav Zubok is Professor of International History and author of The Idea of Russia: The Life and Work of Dmitry Likhachev. Michael Cox is Director of LSE IDEAS and Emeritus Professor of International Relations at LSE. LSE IDEAS (@lseideas) is LSE's foreign policy think tank. We connect academic knowledge of diplomacy and strategy with the people who use it.Speaker(s): Professor John Ikenberry, Professor Mary Kaldor, Professor Peter Trubowitz, Professor Vladislav Zubok | How and why has the liberal promise of the post-Cold War world not been realised? Where is the world now heading? Is the post-Cold War era over? In 1989 the Cold War ended. American pundit, Francis Fukuyama, confidently announced the end of history with the complete victory of liberalism word-wide. Globalisation and democracy represented the wave of the future. But thirty year later the tide of history appears to have turned. Fukuyama now talks bleakly of the crisis of democracy and the possible demise of the liberal order. Book after book proclaims the return of a 'new' Cold War between Russia, China and the West. And globalisation itself is in question. John Ikenberry is Albert G Milbank Professor of Politics and International Affairs, Princeton University. Mary Kaldor is Director of the Conflict and Civil Society Research Unit, Department of International Development, LSE. Peter Trubowitz (@ptrubowitz) is Head of the Department of International Relations and Director of the US Centre at LSE. Vladislav Zubok is Professor of International History and author of The Idea of Russia: The Life and Work of Dmitry Likhachev. Michael Cox is Director of LSE IDEAS and Emeritus Professor of International Relations at LSE. LSE IDEAS (@lseideas) is LSE's foreign policy think tank. We connect academic knowledge of diplomacy and strategy with the people who use it.Wed, 8 May 2019 18:30:00 GMT16 The Meritocracy Trap [Audio]Professor Daniel Markovitshttp://www.tigerscanswim.com/newsAndMedia/videoAndAudio/channels/publicLecturesAndEvents/player.aspx?id=468501:31:17PD7323Speaker(s): Professor Daniel Markovits | Merit is not a genuine excellence but rather a pretence, constructed to rationalise an offensive distribution of advantage. Merit, in short, is a sham. The meritocratic ideal—that social and economic rewards should track achievement rather than breeding—anchors the self-image of the age. Aristocracy has had its day, and meritocracy is now a basic tenet of civil religion in all advanced societies. Meritocracy promises to promote equality and opportunity by opening a previously hereditary elite to outsiders, armed with nothing save their own talents and ambitions. But today, middle-class children lose out to rich children at school, and middle-class adults lose out to elite graduates at work. At the same time, meritocracy entices an anxious and inauthentic elite into a pitiless, lifelong contest to secure income and status through its own excessive industry. In spite of its promises, meritocracy in fact installs a new form of aristocracy, purpose-built for a world in which the greatest source of income and wealth is not land but human capital and free labor. And merit is not a genuine excellence but rather—like the false virtues that aristocrats trumpeted in the ancien régime—a pretense, constructed to rationalize an offensive distribution of advantage. Daniel Markovits is Guido Calabresi Professor of Law at Yale Law School and Founding Director of the Center for the Study of Private Law. Markovits works in the philosophical foundations of private law, moral and political philosophy, and behavioral economics. He publishes in a range of disciplines, including in Science, The American Economic Review, and The Yale Law Journal. Markovits’s latest book, The Meritocracy Trap, places meritocracy at the center of rising economic inequality and social and political dysfunction. The book takes up the law, economics, and politics of human capital to identify the mechanisms through which meritocracy breeds inequality and to expose the burdens that meritocratic inequality imposes on all who fall within meritocracy’s orbit. Oriana Bandiera (@orianabandiera) is the Sir Anthony Atkinson Chair in Economics and Director of STICERD. This event is the Morishima Lecture. This lecture series is held in honour of Professor Michio Morishima (1923-2004), Sir John Hicks Professor of Economics at LSE and STICERD's first chairman. STICERD (@STICERD_LSE) brings together world-class academics to put economics and related disciplines at the forefront of research and policy.Speaker(s): Professor Daniel Markovits | Merit is not a genuine excellence but rather a pretence, constructed to rationalise an offensive distribution of advantage. Merit, in short, is a sham. The meritocratic ideal—that social and economic rewards should track achievement rather than breeding—anchors the self-image of the age. Aristocracy has had its day, and meritocracy is now a basic tenet of civil religion in all advanced societies. Meritocracy promises to promote equality and opportunity by opening a previously hereditary elite to outsiders, armed with nothing save their own talents and ambitions. But today, middle-class children lose out to rich children at school, and middle-class adults lose out to elite graduates at work. At the same time, meritocracy entices an anxious and inauthentic elite into a pitiless, lifelong contest to secure income and status through its own excessive industry. In spite of its promises, meritocracy in fact installs a new form of aristocracy, purpose-built for a world in which the greatest source of income and wealth is not land but human capital and free labor. And merit is not a genuine excellence but rather—like the false virtues that aristocrats trumpeted in the ancien régime—a pretense, constructed to rationalize an offensive distribution of advantage. Daniel Markovits is Guido Calabresi Professor of Law at Yale Law School and Founding Director of the Center for the Study of Private Law. Markovits works in the philosophical foundations of private law, moral and political philosophy, and behavioral economics. He publishes in a range of disciplines, including in Science, The American Economic Review, and The Yale Law Journal. Markovits’s latest book, The Meritocracy Trap, places meritocracy at the center of rising economic inequality and social and political dysfunction. The book takes up the law, economics, and politics of human capital to identify the mechanisms through which meritocracy breeds inequality and to expose the burdens that meritocratic inequality imposes on all who fall within meritocracy’s orbit. Oriana Bandiera (@orianabandiera) is the Sir Anthony Atkinson Chair in Economics and Director of STICERD. This event is the Morishima Lecture. This lecture series is held in honour of Professor Michio Morishima (1923-2004), Sir John Hicks Professor of Economics at LSE and STICERD's first chairman. STICERD (@STICERD_LSE) brings together world-class academics to put economics and related disciplines at the forefront of research and policy.Wed, 8 May 2019 18:30:00 GMT17 Is the Presidency of Donald Trump a Political Aberration? [Audio]Professor Stephen Skowronekhttp://www.tigerscanswim.com/newsAndMedia/videoAndAudio/channels/publicLecturesAndEvents/player.aspx?id=468201:27:58PD7320Speaker(s): Professor Stephen Skowronek | The presidency of Donald Trump is so readily labeled "not normal" and "off-the charts" that it is hard to think of it any other way. Stephen Skowronek examines long-running patterns in the politics of presidential leadership to sort out what is new, and what is not, in the Trump phenomenon. In Skowronek hands presidential history is not a gauzy backdrop to something anomalous, but a critical source of insight into contemporary American politics. Stephen Skowronek is the Pelatiah Perit Professor of Political and Social Science at Yale University. He has published extensively on the development of American national Institutions and on the American presidency. His books include The Politics Presidents Make, Presidential Leadership in Political Time, and most recently, with Karen Orren, The Policy State: An American Predicament. He is currently the Winant Visiting Professor of American Government at the Rothermere American Institute in Oxford. Peter Trubowitz (@ptrubowitz) is Department Head of International Relations and Director of the US Centre at the London School of Economics and Political Science and Associate Fellow at Chatham House, Royal Institute of International Affairs. The LSE's United States Centre (@LSE_US) is a hub for global expertise, analysis and commentary on America. Our mission is to promote policy-relevant and internationally-oriented scholarship to meet the growing demand for fresh analysis and critical debate on the United States.Speaker(s): Professor Stephen Skowronek | The presidency of Donald Trump is so readily labeled "not normal" and "off-the charts" that it is hard to think of it any other way. Stephen Skowronek examines long-running patterns in the politics of presidential leadership to sort out what is new, and what is not, in the Trump phenomenon. In Skowronek hands presidential history is not a gauzy backdrop to something anomalous, but a critical source of insight into contemporary American politics. Stephen Skowronek is the Pelatiah Perit Professor of Political and Social Science at Yale University. He has published extensively on the development of American national Institutions and on the American presidency. His books include The Politics Presidents Make, Presidential Leadership in Political Time, and most recently, with Karen Orren, The Policy State: An American Predicament. He is currently the Winant Visiting Professor of American Government at the Rothermere American Institute in Oxford. Peter Trubowitz (@ptrubowitz) is Department Head of International Relations and Director of the US Centre at the London School of Economics and Political Science and Associate Fellow at Chatham House, Royal Institute of International Affairs. The LSE's United States Centre (@LSE_US) is a hub for global expertise, analysis and commentary on America. Our mission is to promote policy-relevant and internationally-oriented scholarship to meet the growing demand for fresh analysis and critical debate on the United States.Thu, 2 May 2019 18:30:00 GMT18 The Politics of Equality, the 'Populist Moment' and the Power of New Technologies [Audio]Katrín Jakobsdóttirhttp://www.tigerscanswim.com/newsAndMedia/videoAndAudio/channels/publicLecturesAndEvents/player.aspx?id=468301:03:44PD7321Speaker(s): Katrín Jakobsdóttir | Katrín Jakobsdóttir will discuss democratic challenges stemming from social inequalities, authoritarian politics and new technologies. Insecurities generated by globalisation, migration, and transformative technologies have created new societal divisions in liberal democracies and exacerbated the dislocation between personal identities and political loyalties. Since the Great Recession, the populist/authoritarian Right has profited from this trend, which has been accompanied by a critique of contemporary politics as being too technocratic and distant from the people. In her talk, Katrín Jakobsdóttir, the Prime Minister of Iceland, will argue that a renewed focus on the politics of equality is needed to respond to authoritarian tendencies and to the social challenges posed by the “fourth industrial revolution.“ Referring to her own political experience and to various forms of collective action – such as the #metoo movement – she makes the case for a democratic renewal based on social justice, gender equality and the green economy. Katrín Jakobsdóttir (@katrinjak) has been the Prime Minister of Iceland since November 2017 and the Leader of the Left-Green Movement since 2013. She is Iceland’s second female Prime Minister and served as Minister of Education, Science and Culture as well as Minister for Nordic Cooperation from 2009 to 2013. Minouche Shafik is Director of the London School of Economics and Political Science. Prior to this she was Deputy Governor of the Bank of England. The Institute of Global Affairs (@LSEIGA) aims to maximise the impact of LSE's leading expertise across the social sciences by shaping inclusive and locally-rooted responses to the most important and pressing global challenges. The International Inequalities Institute (@LSEInequalities) at LSE brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead cutting-edge research focused on understanding why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges. The Systemic Risk Centre (@LSE_SRC) was set up to study the risks that may trigger the next financial crisis and to develop tools to help policymakers and financial institutions become better prepared.Speaker(s): Katrín Jakobsdóttir | Katrín Jakobsdóttir will discuss democratic challenges stemming from social inequalities, authoritarian politics and new technologies. Insecurities generated by globalisation, migration, and transformative technologies have created new societal divisions in liberal democracies and exacerbated the dislocation between personal identities and political loyalties. Since the Great Recession, the populist/authoritarian Right has profited from this trend, which has been accompanied by a critique of contemporary politics as being too technocratic and distant from the people. In her talk, Katrín Jakobsdóttir, the Prime Minister of Iceland, will argue that a renewed focus on the politics of equality is needed to respond to authoritarian tendencies and to the social challenges posed by the “fourth industrial revolution.“ Referring to her own political experience and to various forms of collective action – such as the #metoo movement – she makes the case for a democratic renewal based on social justice, gender equality and the green economy. Katrín Jakobsdóttir (@katrinjak) has been the Prime Minister of Iceland since November 2017 and the Leader of the Left-Green Movement since 2013. She is Iceland’s second female Prime Minister and served as Minister of Education, Science and Culture as well as Minister for Nordic Cooperation from 2009 to 2013. Minouche Shafik is Director of the London School of Economics and Political Science. Prior to this she was Deputy Governor of the Bank of England. The Institute of Global Affairs (@LSEIGA) aims to maximise the impact of LSE's leading expertise across the social sciences by shaping inclusive and locally-rooted responses to the most important and pressing global challenges. The International Inequalities Institute (@LSEInequalities) at LSE brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead cutting-edge research focused on understanding why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges. The Systemic Risk Centre (@LSE_SRC) was set up to study the risks that may trigger the next financial crisis and to develop tools to help policymakers and financial institutions become better prepared.Thu, 2 May 2019 18:30:00 GMT19 The Generation that Built and Cut Down Democracy [Audio]Zsuzsanna Szelényihttp://www.tigerscanswim.com/newsAndMedia/videoAndAudio/channels/publicLecturesAndEvents/player.aspx?id=468001:26:31PD7318Speaker(s): Zsuzsanna Szelényi | What is happening in Hungary? How has a party of dissident young democrats become a vehicle for illiberal and semi-authoritarian rule, and what does this mean for contemporary politics in Europe? Zsuzsanna Szelényi (@ZSzelenyi) is a Hungarian psychologist and politician. Robin Archer is the Director of the Ralph Miliband Programme, LSE. The Ralph Miliband Programme (@RMilibandLSE) is one of LSE's most prestigious lecture series and seeks to advance Ralph Miliband's spirit of free social inquiry. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEHungarySpeaker(s): Zsuzsanna Szelényi | What is happening in Hungary? How has a party of dissident young democrats become a vehicle for illiberal and semi-authoritarian rule, and what does this mean for contemporary politics in Europe? Zsuzsanna Szelényi (@ZSzelenyi) is a Hungarian psychologist and politician. Robin Archer is the Director of the Ralph Miliband Programme, LSE. The Ralph Miliband Programme (@RMilibandLSE) is one of LSE's most prestigious lecture series and seeks to advance Ralph Miliband's spirit of free social inquiry. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEHungaryTue, 30 Apr 2019 18:30:00 GMT20 Authentic Leadership: how successful leaders build gravitas [Audio]Shanelle Hall, Dr Rebecca Newton, Shaheen Sayed, Shaun Sinniahhttp://www.tigerscanswim.com/newsAndMedia/videoAndAudio/channels/publicLecturesAndEvents/player.aspx?id=470900:44:01PD7356Speaker(s): Shanelle Hall, Dr Rebecca Newton, Shaheen Sayed, Shaun Sinniah | Authentic leadership drives organisational success, yet is often misinterpreted in the workplace. In this book launch and panel session, Dr Rebecca Newton discusses what it really means to lead with authenticity, how to influence with integrity and drive positive change. Shanelle Hall (@shanellehall) was appointed by the United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon as Deputy Executive Director of the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) on 6 June 2016. Shanelle served as Director of UNICEF's Supply Division (2007-2016), the organisation's procurement and logistics headquarters in Copenhagen, where she oversaw UNICEF's global supply activities and emergency supply response, with an annual expenditure exceeding USD 3.4 billion. She helped to expand the Supply function beyond service delivery to being a major strategic contributor to UNICEF results. Prior to that role, Shanelle served as Deputy Director of Supply Division and Chief of Immunization in Supply Division. Rebecca Newton is an organisational and social psychologist and Senior Visiting Fellow in the Department of Management. She has spent the past two decades researching and teaching on leadership, organisational culture, change, collaboration and management practice. Dr Newton has a PhD in Organisational Psychology from the LSE, was a Visiting Fellow at Harvard University, and has run executive education programmes on behalf of the LSE, Duke CE, University of Cambridge and Harvard Law School. She is a regular contributor to Harvard Business Review and Forbes, and serves on the editorial board for the Journal of Change Management. Dr Newton is the CEO of CoachAdviser and has worked with leaders and teams from a range of organisations, including Bank of America, Coca-Cola, Google, HSBC, Microsoft, Nike and more. Her latest book is Authentic Gravitas. Shaheen Sayed (@ShaheenSayed5) is the CEO of Accenture's Government Business in the UK & Ireland. She is a technologist by trade, who has most recently been at the forefront of delivering digital solutions to the Financial Services industry. Recognised as a senior advisor on talent and the workforce of the future, she was included in the Top 100 influential BAME global leaders by the Financial Times as well as Cranfield School of Management’s 100 Women to Watch in their 2018 list. Shaheen is also the Co-Founder Of 'Outsiders' a Not-For-Profit organisation focused on the intersection of youth education and digital technology. Shaun Sinniah works for Guy Carpenter & Company, the wholly owned reinsurance broking subsidiary of Marsh & McLennan, the world's leading professional service firm in the areas of risk, strategy and people. At Guy Carpenter, Shaun is a Managing Director and looks after the Strategy & Sales functions across the International platform. Prior to joining Guy Carpenter, Shaun spent 9 years at Willis Towers Watson and its predecessor firms across group strategy, M&A and reinsurance, where at the age of 29 he became the youngest Managing Director in Willis' 180 year history. Shaun started his career at Goldman Sachs in London and Hong Kong and has a BEng (Hons), MSc and DIC in Engineering from Imperial College. Shaun is a trustee of his local Church and Compassion UK, which provides sponsorship, education and healthcare to over 100,000 children living in poverty around the world. Sandy Pepper joined the Department of Management in September 2008 as an ESRC/FME Fellow. He was appointed Senior Fellow in September 2011 and Professor of Management Practice in January 2013. He previously had a long career at PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) where he held various senior management roles, including global leader of the Human Resource Services consulting practice from 2002-2006.Speaker(s): Shanelle Hall, Dr Rebecca Newton, Shaheen Sayed, Shaun Sinniah | Authentic leadership drives organisational success, yet is often misinterpreted in the workplace. In this book launch and panel session, Dr Rebecca Newton discusses what it really means to lead with authenticity, how to influence with integrity and drive positive change. Shanelle Hall (@shanellehall) was appointed by the United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon as Deputy Executive Director of the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) on 6 June 2016. Shanelle served as Director of UNICEF's Supply Division (2007-2016), the organisation's procurement and logistics headquarters in Copenhagen, where she oversaw UNICEF's global supply activities and emergency supply response, with an annual expenditure exceeding USD 3.4 billion. She helped to expand the Supply function beyond service delivery to being a major strategic contributor to UNICEF results. Prior to that role, Shanelle served as Deputy Director of Supply Division and Chief of Immunization in Supply Division. Rebecca Newton is an organisational and social psychologist and Senior Visiting Fellow in the Department of Management. She has spent the past two decades researching and teaching on leadership, organisational culture, change, collaboration and management practice. Dr Newton has a PhD in Organisational Psychology from the LSE, was a Visiting Fellow at Harvard University, and has run executive education programmes on behalf of the LSE, Duke CE, University of Cambridge and Harvard Law School. She is a regular contributor to Harvard Business Review and Forbes, and serves on the editorial board for the Journal of Change Management. Dr Newton is the CEO of CoachAdviser and has worked with leaders and teams from a range of organisations, including Bank of America, Coca-Cola, Google, HSBC, Microsoft, Nike and more. Her latest book is Authentic Gravitas. Shaheen Sayed (@ShaheenSayed5) is the CEO of Accenture's Government Business in the UK & Ireland. She is a technologist by trade, who has most recently been at the forefront of delivering digital solutions to the Financial Services industry. Recognised as a senior advisor on talent and the workforce of the future, she was included in the Top 100 influential BAME global leaders by the Financial Times as well as Cranfield School of Management’s 100 Women to Watch in their 2018 list. Shaheen is also the Co-Founder Of 'Outsiders' a Not-For-Profit organisation focused on the intersection of youth education and digital technology. Shaun Sinniah works for Guy Carpenter & Company, the wholly owned reinsurance broking subsidiary of Marsh & McLennan, the world's leading professional service firm in the areas of risk, strategy and people. At Guy Carpenter, Shaun is a Managing Director and looks after the Strategy & Sales functions across the International platform. Prior to joining Guy Carpenter, Shaun spent 9 years at Willis Towers Watson and its predecessor firms across group strategy, M&A and reinsurance, where at the age of 29 he became the youngest Managing Director in Willis' 180 year history. Shaun started his career at Goldman Sachs in London and Hong Kong and has a BEng (Hons), MSc and DIC in Engineering from Imperial College. Shaun is a trustee of his local Church and Compassion UK, which provides sponsorship, education and healthcare to over 100,000 children living in poverty around the world. Sandy Pepper joined the Department of Management in September 2008 as an ESRC/FME Fellow. He was appointed Senior Fellow in September 2011 and Professor of Management Practice in January 2013. He previously had a long career at PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) where he held various senior management roles, including global leader of the Human Resource Services consulting practice from 2002-2006.Thu, 25 Apr 2019 18:30:00 GMT21 LSE IQ Episode 24 | How can we age better? [Audio]Professor Hiroko Akiyama, Kath Scanlon, Dr Thijs Van Den Broek, Professor Alan Walkerhttp://www.tigerscanswim.com/newsAndMedia/videoAndAudio/channels/publicLecturesAndEvents/player.aspx?id=467900:41:45PD7317Speaker(s): Professor Hiroko Akiyama, Kath Scanlon, Dr Thijs Van Den Broek, Professor Alan Walker | We hope you're enjoying this year's programme of public events and that you'll stay tuned for the exciting events we have lined up, for the summer term. In the meantime we have another podcast series we think you might enjoy. LSE IQ is an award-winning monthly podcast in which we ask some of the smartest social scientists - and other experts - to answer intelligent questions about economics, politics or society. Recent episodes have tackled questions such as 'Is the gentrification of our global cities inevitable?', 'Should we fear the rise of the far right?' and 'How does the modern world affect relationships?'. To give you a taste of LSEIQ the latest episode, which asks 'How can we age better?', is available for you here in our public events podcast feed. To listen to other episodes, search for LSE IQ in your favourite podcast app or visit lse.ac.uk/iq. We'd like to hear your opinion too so why not join the discussion on social media using the hashtag LSEIQ and please also consider leaving a review on iTunes as this makes the podcast easier for new listeners to discover.Speaker(s): Professor Hiroko Akiyama, Kath Scanlon, Dr Thijs Van Den Broek, Professor Alan Walker | We hope you're enjoying this year's programme of public events and that you'll stay tuned for the exciting events we have lined up, for the summer term. In the meantime we have another podcast series we think you might enjoy. LSE IQ is an award-winning monthly podcast in which we ask some of the smartest social scientists - and other experts - to answer intelligent questions about economics, politics or society. Recent episodes have tackled questions such as 'Is the gentrification of our global cities inevitable?', 'Should we fear the rise of the far right?' and 'How does the modern world affect relationships?'. To give you a taste of LSEIQ the latest episode, which asks 'How can we age better?', is available for you here in our public events podcast feed. To listen to other episodes, search for LSE IQ in your favourite podcast app or visit lse.ac.uk/iq. We'd like to hear your opinion too so why not join the discussion on social media using the hashtag LSEIQ and please also consider leaving a review on iTunes as this makes the podcast easier for new listeners to discover.Tue, 16 Apr 2019 12:01:00 GMT22 In Conversation with U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi [Audio]Nancy Pelosihttp://www.tigerscanswim.com/newsAndMedia/videoAndAudio/channels/publicLecturesAndEvents/player.aspx?id=467501:17:10PD7313Speaker(s): Nancy Pelosi | Join us for this conversation between Nancy Pelosi, Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives and LSE's Peter Trubowitz, Director of the US Centre at the School. Nancy Pelosi (@SpeakerPelosi) is the 52nd Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives, having made history in 2007 when she was elected the first woman to serve as Speaker of the House. Now in her third term as Speaker, Pelosi made history again in January 2019 when she regained her position second-in-line to the presidency, the first person to do so in more than 60 years. Speaker Pelosi is the highest ranking woman in American history and the most powerful Democrat in Washington. Peter Trubowitz (@ptrubowitz) is Department Head of International Relations and Director of the US Centre at the London School of Economics and Political Science and Associate Fellow at Chatham House, Royal Institute of International Affairs. The LSE's United States Centre (@LSE_US) is a hub for global expertise, analysis and commentary on America. Our mission is to promote policy-relevant and internationally-oriented scholarship to meet the growing demand for fresh analysis and critical debate on the United States. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEPelosi Video The recording of the Facebook Live of this event is available to watch at In Conversation with U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi.Speaker(s): Nancy Pelosi | Join us for this conversation between Nancy Pelosi, Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives and LSE's Peter Trubowitz, Director of the US Centre at the School. Nancy Pelosi (@SpeakerPelosi) is the 52nd Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives, having made history in 2007 when she was elected the first woman to serve as Speaker of the House. Now in her third term as Speaker, Pelosi made history again in January 2019 when she regained her position second-in-line to the presidency, the first person to do so in more than 60 years. Speaker Pelosi is the highest ranking woman in American history and the most powerful Democrat in Washington. Peter Trubowitz (@ptrubowitz) is Department Head of International Relations and Director of the US Centre at the London School of Economics and Political Science and Associate Fellow at Chatham House, Royal Institute of International Affairs. The LSE's United States Centre (@LSE_US) is a hub for global expertise, analysis and commentary on America. Our mission is to promote policy-relevant and internationally-oriented scholarship to meet the growing demand for fresh analysis and critical debate on the United States. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEPelosi Video The recording of the Facebook Live of this event is available to watch at In Conversation with U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi.Mon, 15 Apr 2019 18:30:00 GMT23 Politics, Humanitarianism and Children's Rights [Audio]Sir Mike Aaronson, Maryam Ahmed, Mary Robinson, Rafia Zakariahttp://www.tigerscanswim.com/newsAndMedia/videoAndAudio/channels/publicLecturesAndEvents/player.aspx?id=467701:32:21PD7315Speaker(s): Sir Mike Aaronson, Maryam Ahmed, Mary Robinson, Rafia Zakaria | In 2019, Save the Children celebrates 100 years of working at the interface of politics, humanitarianism, and children’s rights. What does the future hold? Bringing together a panel of leading experts, the conversation will analyse how children's rights have transformed over the last 100 years. We will consider how the relationship between politics and humanitarianism is changing amidst transformations in the global ideological landscape, and where this leaves us for the future. Mike Aaronson (@MikeAaronson) was Director General of Save the Children UK 1995-2005. Maryam Ahmed graduated as a youth ambassador for Save the Children Nigeria in 2018. She has advocated for children's rights in Nigeria and in international forums. She particularly campaigns to end child marriage and sexual abuse, and to ensure girls have access to education and reproductive rights. Mary Robinson served as President of Ireland (1990-97) and UN High Commissioner for Human Rights (1997-2002). Rafia Zakaria (@rafiazakaria) is an author and attorney, she served on the Board of Amnesty International USA for two terms between 2009-2015 and was the first Pakistani-American woman to do so. Alcinda Honwana is an LSE Centennial Professor and Inter-Regional Adviser at UN DESA. Based at LSE in Pethick-Lawrence House, the Firoz Lalji Centre for Africa (@AfricaAtLSE) promotes independent academic research and teaching; open and issue-oriented debate; and evidence-based policy making. The Centre accomplishes this by connecting different social science disciplines and by working in partnership with Africa bringing African voices to the global debate. Twitter Hashtags for this event: #LSESave #SCconf100 Video The recording of the Facebook Live of this event is available to watch at Politics, Humanitarianism and Children's Rights.Speaker(s): Sir Mike Aaronson, Maryam Ahmed, Mary Robinson, Rafia Zakaria | In 2019, Save the Children celebrates 100 years of working at the interface of politics, humanitarianism, and children’s rights. What does the future hold? Bringing together a panel of leading experts, the conversation will analyse how children's rights have transformed over the last 100 years. We will consider how the relationship between politics and humanitarianism is changing amidst transformations in the global ideological landscape, and where this leaves us for the future. Mike Aaronson (@MikeAaronson) was Director General of Save the Children UK 1995-2005. Maryam Ahmed graduated as a youth ambassador for Save the Children Nigeria in 2018. She has advocated for children's rights in Nigeria and in international forums. She particularly campaigns to end child marriage and sexual abuse, and to ensure girls have access to education and reproductive rights. Mary Robinson served as President of Ireland (1990-97) and UN High Commissioner for Human Rights (1997-2002). Rafia Zakaria (@rafiazakaria) is an author and attorney, she served on the Board of Amnesty International USA for two terms between 2009-2015 and was the first Pakistani-American woman to do so. Alcinda Honwana is an LSE Centennial Professor and Inter-Regional Adviser at UN DESA. Based at LSE in Pethick-Lawrence House, the Firoz Lalji Centre for Africa (@AfricaAtLSE) promotes independent academic research and teaching; open and issue-oriented debate; and evidence-based policy making. The Centre accomplishes this by connecting different social science disciplines and by working in partnership with Africa bringing African voices to the global debate. Twitter Hashtags for this event: #LSESave #SCconf100 Video The recording of the Facebook Live of this event is available to watch at Politics, Humanitarianism and Children's Rights.Mon, 8 Apr 2019 18:30:00 GMT24 Inequality, Brexit and the End of Empire [Audio]Professor Danny Dorling, Professor Sally Tomlinson, Professor Gurminder K Bhambra, Professor Will Huttonhttp://www.tigerscanswim.com/newsAndMedia/videoAndAudio/channels/publicLecturesAndEvents/player.aspx?id=466901:27:42PD7307Speaker(s): Professor Danny Dorling, Professor Sally Tomlinson, Professor Gurminder K Bhambra, Professor Will Hutton | In 2016, the UK voted to leave the European Union – but has yet to leave its Empire past behind. What part did the long afterlife of the world’s largest-ever Empire play in Britain’s view of itself and world? And could a post-EU Britain, against all the odds, become less unequal? Join us as four eminent scholars turn their attention to often overlooked elements in the story – Britain’s past imperial might, jingoism, mythmaking and racism; deep-set anxieties about change and conflicting visions of the future – and the possibility of an unexpected outcome, namely that its shock to the national system may slow or even reverse the decades-long rise of inequality. In their new co-authored book Rule Britannia: Brexit and the End of Empire, Danny Dorling and Sally Tomlinson argue that while Brexit will almost certainly require the UK to confront its own “shocking, Dorian Gray-like deteriorated image”, “out of the ashes of Brexit could, should and perhaps will come a chastened, less small-minded, less greedy future. There are good reasons to be hopeful.” Danny Dorling (@dannydorling) is Halford Mackinder Professor of Geography at the University of Oxford. He is author of books including Peak Inequality: Britain’s Ticking Time Bomb, The Equality Effect: Improving Life for Everyone and All That Is Solid: How the Great Housing Disaster Defines Our Times, and What We Can Do About It. Sally Tomlinson is Emeritus Professor at Goldsmiths University of London and Honorary Research Fellow in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. She is author of books including A Sociology of Special and Inclusive Education: Exploring the Manufacture of Inability and Education and Race from Empire to Brexit. Gurminder K Bhambra (@GKBhambra) is Professor of Postcolonial and Decolonial Studies in the School of Global Studies at the University of Sussex. She is author of books including Connected Sociologies: Theory for a Global Age. Will Hutton (@williamnhutton) is principal of Hertford College, Oxford, and Visiting Professor at the University of Manchester Business School. Bev Skeggs(@bevskeggs) is Professor of Sociology and Academic Director of the Atlantic Fellows for Social and Economic Equity programme at the International Inequalities Institute. The Atlantic Fellows for Social and Economic Equity programme is one of seven Atlantic Fellowships around the world, committed to building a global community of leaders working together to advance equity, justice and human dignity. The International Inequalities Institute (@LSEInequalities) at LSE brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead cutting-edge research focused on understanding why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges. This event is supported by the Progressive Economy Forum (@PEF_online). PEF brings together a Council of eminent economists and academics to develop and advocate progressive economic policy ideas, and to improve public understanding of key economic issues. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEInequality Update: due to unforeseen circumstances Professor John Weeks is no longer speaking at this event.Speaker(s): Professor Danny Dorling, Professor Sally Tomlinson, Professor Gurminder K Bhambra, Professor Will Hutton | In 2016, the UK voted to leave the European Union – but has yet to leave its Empire past behind. What part did the long afterlife of the world’s largest-ever Empire play in Britain’s view of itself and world? And could a post-EU Britain, against all the odds, become less unequal? Join us as four eminent scholars turn their attention to often overlooked elements in the story – Britain’s past imperial might, jingoism, mythmaking and racism; deep-set anxieties about change and conflicting visions of the future – and the possibility of an unexpected outcome, namely that its shock to the national system may slow or even reverse the decades-long rise of inequality. In their new co-authored book Rule Britannia: Brexit and the End of Empire, Danny Dorling and Sally Tomlinson argue that while Brexit will almost certainly require the UK to confront its own “shocking, Dorian Gray-like deteriorated image”, “out of the ashes of Brexit could, should and perhaps will come a chastened, less small-minded, less greedy future. There are good reasons to be hopeful.” Danny Dorling (@dannydorling) is Halford Mackinder Professor of Geography at the University of Oxford. He is author of books including Peak Inequality: Britain’s Ticking Time Bomb, The Equality Effect: Improving Life for Everyone and All That Is Solid: How the Great Housing Disaster Defines Our Times, and What We Can Do About It. Sally Tomlinson is Emeritus Professor at Goldsmiths University of London and Honorary Research Fellow in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. She is author of books including A Sociology of Special and Inclusive Education: Exploring the Manufacture of Inability and Education and Race from Empire to Brexit. Gurminder K Bhambra (@GKBhambra) is Professor of Postcolonial and Decolonial Studies in the School of Global Studies at the University of Sussex. She is author of books including Connected Sociologies: Theory for a Global Age. Will Hutton (@williamnhutton) is principal of Hertford College, Oxford, and Visiting Professor at the University of Manchester Business School. Bev Skeggs(@bevskeggs) is Professor of Sociology and Academic Director of the Atlantic Fellows for Social and Economic Equity programme at the International Inequalities Institute. The Atlantic Fellows for Social and Economic Equity programme is one of seven Atlantic Fellowships around the world, committed to building a global community of leaders working together to advance equity, justice and human dignity. The International Inequalities Institute (@LSEInequalities) at LSE brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead cutting-edge research focused on understanding why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges. This event is supported by the Progressive Economy Forum (@PEF_online). PEF brings together a Council of eminent economists and academics to develop and advocate progressive economic policy ideas, and to improve public understanding of key economic issues. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEInequality Update: due to unforeseen circumstances Professor John Weeks is no longer speaking at this event.Fri, 29 Mar 2019 18:30:00 GMT25 Brexit: what have we learnt? What can we expect? [Audio]Professor Catherine Barnard, Professor Sir Charles Bean, Jill Rutterhttp://www.tigerscanswim.com/newsAndMedia/videoAndAudio/channels/publicLecturesAndEvents/player.aspx?id=468101:31:33PD7319Speaker(s): Professor Catherine Barnard, Professor Sir Charles Bean, Jill Rutter | Editor's note: Unfortunately the last few minutes of the event are missing from the podcast. Our panel reviews what has been decided and resolved on Brexit, as well as the short- and long-term implications for Britain. Catherine Barnard (@CSBarnard24) is Professor in European Union Law and Employment Law at the University of Cambridge, and senior tutor and fellow of Trinity College. She specialises in EU law and employment law. She is author of EU Employment Law, The Substantive Law of the EU: The Four Freedoms, and (with Peers ed), European Union Law. Currently, Catherine is a Senior Fellow in the ESRC’s UK in a Changing Europe project which looks at all aspects of Brexit in its various manifestations. Charles Bean is Professor of Economics in the Department of Economics at LSE and former Deputy Governor of the Bank of England. Jill Rutter (@jillongovt) is a programme director for Brexit at the Institute for Government and has co-authored a number of the Institute reports on the implications of Brexit for Whitehall and Westminster. She has also produced reports on better policy making, most recently on making tax policy better, arm’s length governance and on the centre. Before joining IFG, Jill was Director of Strategy and Sustainable Development at Defra. Prior to that she worked for BP for six years, following a career in the Treasury, and a two nd a half years secondment to the No.10 Policy Unit. Kevin Featherstone is Eleftherios Venizelos Professor of Contemporary Greek Studies and Professor of European Politics and Director of the Hellenic Observatory. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. The School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) equips you with the skills and ideas to transform people and societies. We are an international community where ideas and practice meet. Our approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance.Speaker(s): Professor Catherine Barnard, Professor Sir Charles Bean, Jill Rutter | Editor's note: Unfortunately the last few minutes of the event are missing from the podcast. Our panel reviews what has been decided and resolved on Brexit, as well as the short- and long-term implications for Britain. Catherine Barnard (@CSBarnard24) is Professor in European Union Law and Employment Law at the University of Cambridge, and senior tutor and fellow of Trinity College. She specialises in EU law and employment law. She is author of EU Employment Law, The Substantive Law of the EU: The Four Freedoms, and (with Peers ed), European Union Law. Currently, Catherine is a Senior Fellow in the ESRC’s UK in a Changing Europe project which looks at all aspects of Brexit in its various manifestations. Charles Bean is Professor of Economics in the Department of Economics at LSE and former Deputy Governor of the Bank of England. Jill Rutter (@jillongovt) is a programme director for Brexit at the Institute for Government and has co-authored a number of the Institute reports on the implications of Brexit for Whitehall and Westminster. She has also produced reports on better policy making, most recently on making tax policy better, arm’s length governance and on the centre. Before joining IFG, Jill was Director of Strategy and Sustainable Development at Defra. Prior to that she worked for BP for six years, following a career in the Treasury, and a two nd a half years secondment to the No.10 Policy Unit. Kevin Featherstone is Eleftherios Venizelos Professor of Contemporary Greek Studies and Professor of European Politics and Director of the Hellenic Observatory. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. The School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) equips you with the skills and ideas to transform people and societies. We are an international community where ideas and practice meet. Our approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance.Thu, 28 Mar 2019 18:30:00 GMT26 Learning from Data: the art of statistics [Audio]Professor David Spiegelhalterhttp://www.tigerscanswim.com/newsAndMedia/videoAndAudio/channels/publicLecturesAndEvents/player.aspx?id=466301:28:15PD7301Speaker(s): Professor David Spiegelhalter | In his new book, The Art of Statistics, David Spiegelhalter guides us through the essential principles we need in order to derive knowledge from data, showing us why data can never speak for itself. He explains the basic concepts, from regression to P-values (without using mathematics), and introduces the intellectual ideas that underpin statistics. Drawing on numerous real world examples, he shows us how statistics can help us determine the luckiest passenger on the Titanic, whether serial killer Harold Shipman could have been caught earlier, and if the skeleton in the Leicester car park really was Richard III. Sir David Spiegelhalter is a British statistician and Chair of the Winton Centre for Risk and Evidence Communication in the Statistical Laboratory at the University of Cambridge. Spiegelhalter is one of the most cited and influential researchers in his field, and was elected as President of the Royal Statistical Society for 2017-18. Fiona Steele is a Professor of Statistics and Deputy Head of the Department of Statistics at LSE. Fiona first joined in LSE in 1996 as Lecturer in Statistics and Research Methodology. She then worked at the Institute of Education, University of London 2001-2005, followed by the University of Bristol 2005-2013 where she was Professor of Social Statistics and Director of the Centre for Multilevel Modelling. She returned to LSE in 2013. The Department of Statistics (@StatsDeptLSE) offers a vibrant research environment and a comprehensive programme of undergraduate and postgraduate degrees.Speaker(s): Professor David Spiegelhalter | In his new book, The Art of Statistics, David Spiegelhalter guides us through the essential principles we need in order to derive knowledge from data, showing us why data can never speak for itself. He explains the basic concepts, from regression to P-values (without using mathematics), and introduces the intellectual ideas that underpin statistics. Drawing on numerous real world examples, he shows us how statistics can help us determine the luckiest passenger on the Titanic, whether serial killer Harold Shipman could have been caught earlier, and if the skeleton in the Leicester car park really was Richard III. Sir David Spiegelhalter is a British statistician and Chair of the Winton Centre for Risk and Evidence Communication in the Statistical Laboratory at the University of Cambridge. Spiegelhalter is one of the most cited and influential researchers in his field, and was elected as President of the Royal Statistical Society for 2017-18. Fiona Steele is a Professor of Statistics and Deputy Head of the Department of Statistics at LSE. Fiona first joined in LSE in 1996 as Lecturer in Statistics and Research Methodology. She then worked at the Institute of Education, University of London 2001-2005, followed by the University of Bristol 2005-2013 where she was Professor of Social Statistics and Director of the Centre for Multilevel Modelling. She returned to LSE in 2013. The Department of Statistics (@StatsDeptLSE) offers a vibrant research environment and a comprehensive programme of undergraduate and postgraduate degrees.Wed, 27 Mar 2019 18:30:00 GMT27 Marx at 201: the legacy of Karl Marx for the contemporary study of law, politics and society [Audio]Professor Bob Jessop, Professor Costas Lapavitsas, Professor Peter Ramsay, Professor Lea Ypihttp://www.tigerscanswim.com/newsAndMedia/videoAndAudio/channels/publicLecturesAndEvents/player.aspx?id=466401:32:29PD7302Speaker(s): Professor Bob Jessop, Professor Costas Lapavitsas, Professor Peter Ramsay, Professor Lea Ypi | Are we all Marxists now? Which of Marx’s ideas remain relevant, which redundant? Join leading scholars to address Marx’s legacy at 201. Are we all Marxists now? The question may sound strange but the virtues of the German philosopher are now extolled in the most unlikely of places. If this may be partly explained by the recent flurry of biographies and anniversaries – 2017 saw anniversaries of Das Kapital and the Russian Revolution, 2018 the bicentenary of his birth - the extraordinary growth of interest in Marx since the financial crisis seems undeniable. Socialism is even a talking point in the United States of America. and yet, the world looks as far removed from any communist utopia as could be imagined. Capitalism has accelerated; neoliberalism remains dominant, social democracy largely in retreat. If the political and ideological ascendency of capital has been fractured in the recent period, this seems predominantly to have benefitted the Right, leading to fears that a very different spectre from the one envisaged by Marx may now be haunting Europe, and the globe. Now therefore seems an opportune moment to reflect on the legacy of Karl Marx for the contemporary study of law, politics and society. Why is his influence so pervasive and resilient? Which ideas remain relevant, which redundant? The purpose of this event is to explore these questions with leading scholars from across different disciplines: economics, political theory, sociology and law. Bob Jessop is Professor of Sociology at the University of Lancaster. Costas Lapavitsas (@C_Lapavitsas) is Professor of Economics at SOAS. Peter Ramsay (@PeterRamsay2011) is Professor of Law at LSE. Lea Ypi (@lea_ypi) is Professor in Political Theory at LSE. Mike Wilkinson is Associate Professor of Law at LSE. LSE Law (@LSELaw) is one of the world's top law schools with an international reputation for the quality of its teaching and legal research.Speaker(s): Professor Bob Jessop, Professor Costas Lapavitsas, Professor Peter Ramsay, Professor Lea Ypi | Are we all Marxists now? Which of Marx’s ideas remain relevant, which redundant? Join leading scholars to address Marx’s legacy at 201. Are we all Marxists now? The question may sound strange but the virtues of the German philosopher are now extolled in the most unlikely of places. If this may be partly explained by the recent flurry of biographies and anniversaries – 2017 saw anniversaries of Das Kapital and the Russian Revolution, 2018 the bicentenary of his birth - the extraordinary growth of interest in Marx since the financial crisis seems undeniable. Socialism is even a talking point in the United States of America. and yet, the world looks as far removed from any communist utopia as could be imagined. Capitalism has accelerated; neoliberalism remains dominant, social democracy largely in retreat. If the political and ideological ascendency of capital has been fractured in the recent period, this seems predominantly to have benefitted the Right, leading to fears that a very different spectre from the one envisaged by Marx may now be haunting Europe, and the globe. Now therefore seems an opportune moment to reflect on the legacy of Karl Marx for the contemporary study of law, politics and society. Why is his influence so pervasive and resilient? Which ideas remain relevant, which redundant? The purpose of this event is to explore these questions with leading scholars from across different disciplines: economics, political theory, sociology and law. Bob Jessop is Professor of Sociology at the University of Lancaster. Costas Lapavitsas (@C_Lapavitsas) is Professor of Economics at SOAS. Peter Ramsay (@PeterRamsay2011) is Professor of Law at LSE. Lea Ypi (@lea_ypi) is Professor in Political Theory at LSE. Mike Wilkinson is Associate Professor of Law at LSE. LSE Law (@LSELaw) is one of the world's top law schools with an international reputation for the quality of its teaching and legal research.Wed, 27 Mar 2019 18:30:00 GMT28 Intergenerational Justice and Generational Sovereignty in Light of Brexit Vote and of Climate Change [Audio]Professor Axel Gosserieshttp://www.tigerscanswim.com/newsAndMedia/videoAndAudio/channels/publicLecturesAndEvents/player.aspx?id=466201:20:26PD7300Speaker(s): Professor Axel Gosseries | Do the intergenerational issues raised by climate change differ from those raised by the Brexit vote? And what can we do to address these issues? Axel Gosseries is Professor of Economics and Social Ethics at Louvain University. The Ralph Miliband Programme (@RMilibandLSE) is one of LSE's most prestigious lecture series and seeks to advance Ralph Miliband's spirit of free social inquiry. The Department of Philosophy, Logic and Scientific Method (@LSEPhilosophy) was founded by Professor Sir Karl Popper in 1946, and remains internationally renowned for a type of philosophy that is both continuous with the sciences and socially relevant.Speaker(s): Professor Axel Gosseries | Do the intergenerational issues raised by climate change differ from those raised by the Brexit vote? And what can we do to address these issues? Axel Gosseries is Professor of Economics and Social Ethics at Louvain University. The Ralph Miliband Programme (@RMilibandLSE) is one of LSE's most prestigious lecture series and seeks to advance Ralph Miliband's spirit of free social inquiry. The Department of Philosophy, Logic and Scientific Method (@LSEPhilosophy) was founded by Professor Sir Karl Popper in 1946, and remains internationally renowned for a type of philosophy that is both continuous with the sciences and socially relevant.Tue, 26 Mar 2019 18:30:00 GMT29 Cryptocurrencies: the issue of scalability [Audio]Dr Andrew Lewis-Pyehttp://www.tigerscanswim.com/newsAndMedia/videoAndAudio/channels/publicLecturesAndEvents/player.aspx?id=466001:29:47PD7297Speaker(s): Dr Andrew Lewis-Pye | Perhaps the most fundamental challenge for the future of cryptocurrencies is the issue of scalability: How can one dramatically increase transaction rates without sacrificing the security of the blockchain? In this talk Andrew Lewis-Pye will start by giving an overview of the fundamentals of cryptocurrencies (a digital currency in which encryption techniques are used to regulate the generation of units of currency and verify the transfer of funds, operating independently of a central bank), with a focus on analysing protocols from a game theoretic perspective. Then he will go on to discuss possible solutions to the scalability issue. Andrew Lewis-Pye is Associate Professor in the Department of Mathematics at LSE. Jan van den Heuvel (@JanvadeHe) is Professor of Mathematics at LSE. LSE's Department of Mathematics (@LSEMaths), located within a world-class social science institution, aims to be a leading centre for Mathematics in the Social Sciences. We have a stimulating and active research environment and offer a wide range of degree programmes and courses. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEMathsSpeaker(s): Dr Andrew Lewis-Pye | Perhaps the most fundamental challenge for the future of cryptocurrencies is the issue of scalability: How can one dramatically increase transaction rates without sacrificing the security of the blockchain? In this talk Andrew Lewis-Pye will start by giving an overview of the fundamentals of cryptocurrencies (a digital currency in which encryption techniques are used to regulate the generation of units of currency and verify the transfer of funds, operating independently of a central bank), with a focus on analysing protocols from a game theoretic perspective. Then he will go on to discuss possible solutions to the scalability issue. Andrew Lewis-Pye is Associate Professor in the Department of Mathematics at LSE. Jan van den Heuvel (@JanvadeHe) is Professor of Mathematics at LSE. LSE's Department of Mathematics (@LSEMaths), located within a world-class social science institution, aims to be a leading centre for Mathematics in the Social Sciences. We have a stimulating and active research environment and offer a wide range of degree programmes and courses. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEMathsWed, 20 Mar 2019 18:30:00 GMT30 Occult Features of Anarchism: with attention to the conspiracy of kings and the conspiracy of the peoples [Audio]Dr Erica Lagalissehttp://www.tigerscanswim.com/newsAndMedia/videoAndAudio/channels/publicLecturesAndEvents/player.aspx?id=467601:30:42PD7314Speaker(s): Dr Erica Lagalisse | Erica Lagalisse explores the relationship of 19th century anarchism with the clandestine fraternity, challenges leftist attachments to atheism, and intervenes in current debates concerning “conspiracy theory”. In the nineteenth century anarchists were accused of conspiracy by governments afraid of revolution, but in the current century various “conspiracy theories” suggest that anarchists are controlled by government itself. The Illuminati were a network of intellectuals who argued for self-government and against private property, yet the public is now often told that they were (and are) the very group that controls governments and defends private property around the world. Intervening in such misinformation, Lagalisse works with primary and secondary sources in multiple languages to set straight the history of the Left and will illustrate the actual relationship between revolutionism, pantheistic occult philosophy, and the clandestine fraternity. Exploring hidden correspondences between anarchism, Renaissance magic, and New Age movements, Erica Lagalisse also advances critical scholarship regarding leftist attachments to secular politics. Inspired by anthropological fieldwork within today’s anarchist movements, challenging anarchist atheism insofar as it poses practical challenges for coalition politics in today’s world. Studying anarchism as a historical object, Lagalisse will show how the development of leftist theory and practice within clandestine masculine public spheres continues to inform contemporary anarchist understandings of the “political,” in which men’s oppression by the state becomes the prototype for power in general, how gender and religion become privatized in radical counterculture, a historical process intimately linked to the privatization of gender and religion by the modern nation-state. Erica Lagalisse, author of Occult Features of Anarchism, is an anthropologist and Postdoctoral Fellow at the International Inequalities Institute, LSE. Mathijs Pelkmans is an Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology, LSE. The International Inequalities Institute (@LSEInequalities) at LSE brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead critical and cutting edge research to understand why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges.Speaker(s): Dr Erica Lagalisse | Erica Lagalisse explores the relationship of 19th century anarchism with the clandestine fraternity, challenges leftist attachments to atheism, and intervenes in current debates concerning “conspiracy theory”. In the nineteenth century anarchists were accused of conspiracy by governments afraid of revolution, but in the current century various “conspiracy theories” suggest that anarchists are controlled by government itself. The Illuminati were a network of intellectuals who argued for self-government and against private property, yet the public is now often told that they were (and are) the very group that controls governments and defends private property around the world. Intervening in such misinformation, Lagalisse works with primary and secondary sources in multiple languages to set straight the history of the Left and will illustrate the actual relationship between revolutionism, pantheistic occult philosophy, and the clandestine fraternity. Exploring hidden correspondences between anarchism, Renaissance magic, and New Age movements, Erica Lagalisse also advances critical scholarship regarding leftist attachments to secular politics. Inspired by anthropological fieldwork within today’s anarchist movements, challenging anarchist atheism insofar as it poses practical challenges for coalition politics in today’s world. Studying anarchism as a historical object, Lagalisse will show how the development of leftist theory and practice within clandestine masculine public spheres continues to inform contemporary anarchist understandings of the “political,” in which men’s oppression by the state becomes the prototype for power in general, how gender and religion become privatized in radical counterculture, a historical process intimately linked to the privatization of gender and religion by the modern nation-state. Erica Lagalisse, author of Occult Features of Anarchism, is an anthropologist and Postdoctoral Fellow at the International Inequalities Institute, LSE. Mathijs Pelkmans is an Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology, LSE. The International Inequalities Institute (@LSEInequalities) at LSE brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead critical and cutting edge research to understand why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges.Wed, 20 Mar 2019 18:30:00 GMT31 Silences of the Great War: all the things we cannot hear [Audio]Professor Jay Winterhttp://www.tigerscanswim.com/newsAndMedia/videoAndAudio/channels/publicLecturesAndEvents/player.aspx?id=465701:27:35PD7291Speaker(s): Professor Jay Winter | Silence itself is a language of memory. Jay Winter explores the dialectic between silence and sound in the auditory history of the Great War. Jay Winter is Charles J Stille Professor of History Emeritus, Yale University. Robin Archer is Director of the Ralph Miliband Programme at LSE. Robin Archer is Director of the Ralph Miliband Programme at LSE. The Ralph Miliband Programme (@RMilibandLSE) is one of LSE's most prestigious lecture series and seeks to advance Ralph Miliband's spirit of free social inquiry.Speaker(s): Professor Jay Winter | Silence itself is a language of memory. Jay Winter explores the dialectic between silence and sound in the auditory history of the Great War. Jay Winter is Charles J Stille Professor of History Emeritus, Yale University. Robin Archer is Director of the Ralph Miliband Programme at LSE. Robin Archer is Director of the Ralph Miliband Programme at LSE. The Ralph Miliband Programme (@RMilibandLSE) is one of LSE's most prestigious lecture series and seeks to advance Ralph Miliband's spirit of free social inquiry.Mon, 18 Mar 2019 18:30:00 GMT32 How did we Reach the Present Crisis in Social Care and what are the Solutions? [Audio]Professor Pat Thanehttp://www.tigerscanswim.com/newsAndMedia/videoAndAudio/channels/publicLecturesAndEvents/player.aspx?id=465501:18:00PD7289Speaker(s): Professor Pat Thane | The social and health needs of older people are not easily separable. But care has been institutionally separate since 1948. Did this help create the current crisis? Pat Thane is Research Professor in Contemporary History, King's College London. Robin Archer is the Director of the Ralph Miliband Programme, LSE. The Ralph Miliband Programme (@RMilibandLSE) is one of LSE's most prestigious lecture series and seeks to advance Ralph Miliband's spirit of free social inquiry. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSESocialCareSpeaker(s): Professor Pat Thane | The social and health needs of older people are not easily separable. But care has been institutionally separate since 1948. Did this help create the current crisis? Pat Thane is Research Professor in Contemporary History, King's College London. Robin Archer is the Director of the Ralph Miliband Programme, LSE. The Ralph Miliband Programme (@RMilibandLSE) is one of LSE's most prestigious lecture series and seeks to advance Ralph Miliband's spirit of free social inquiry. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSESocialCareThu, 14 Mar 2019 18:30:00 GMT33 Foundations of State Effectiveness [Audio]Professor Sir Tim Besley, Professor Amartya Senhttp://www.tigerscanswim.com/newsAndMedia/videoAndAudio/channels/publicLecturesAndEvents/player.aspx?id=465401:26:13PD7285Speaker(s): Professor Sir Tim Besley, Professor Amartya Sen | An effective state promotes freedom and the well-being of its citizens. This lecture will discuss the importance of norms, values and institutions in supporting state effectiveness drawing on recent developments in social science. As well as making connections to Amartya Sen's ideas, the lecture will reflect on some of the major policy challenges that the world faces in the turbulent times that we are living through. Tim Besley is School Professor of Economics of Political Science and Sir W. Arthur Lewis Professor of Development Economics in the Department of Economics at LSE. He is also a member of the National Infrastructure Commission and was President of the Econometric Society in 2018. He has published widely on a wide variety of topics, mainly with a policy focus. Amartya Sen is Thomas W Lamont University Professor and Professor of Economics and Philosophy at Harvard University. He is the recipient of the 1998 Nobel Prize in Economics and an LSE Honorary Fellow. Minouche Shafik is Director of the London School of Economics and Political Science. Prior to this she was Deputy Governor of the Bank of England. STICERD (@STICERD_LSE) brings together world-class academics to put economics and related disciplines at the forefront of research and policy. Founded in 1978 by the renowned Japanese economist Michio Morishima, with donations from Suntory and Toyota, we are a thriving research community within the LSE. The International Inequalities Institute (@LSEInequalities) brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to provide co-ordination and strategic leadership for critical and cutting edge research and inter-disciplinary analysis of inequalities.Speaker(s): Professor Sir Tim Besley, Professor Amartya Sen | An effective state promotes freedom and the well-being of its citizens. This lecture will discuss the importance of norms, values and institutions in supporting state effectiveness drawing on recent developments in social science. As well as making connections to Amartya Sen's ideas, the lecture will reflect on some of the major policy challenges that the world faces in the turbulent times that we are living through. Tim Besley is School Professor of Economics of Political Science and Sir W. Arthur Lewis Professor of Development Economics in the Department of Economics at LSE. He is also a member of the National Infrastructure Commission and was President of the Econometric Society in 2018. He has published widely on a wide variety of topics, mainly with a policy focus. Amartya Sen is Thomas W Lamont University Professor and Professor of Economics and Philosophy at Harvard University. He is the recipient of the 1998 Nobel Prize in Economics and an LSE Honorary Fellow. Minouche Shafik is Director of the London School of Economics and Political Science. Prior to this she was Deputy Governor of the Bank of England. STICERD (@STICERD_LSE) brings together world-class academics to put economics and related disciplines at the forefront of research and policy. Founded in 1978 by the renowned Japanese economist Michio Morishima, with donations from Suntory and Toyota, we are a thriving research community within the LSE. The International Inequalities Institute (@LSEInequalities) brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to provide co-ordination and strategic leadership for critical and cutting edge research and inter-disciplinary analysis of inequalities.Wed, 13 Mar 2019 18:30:00 GMT34 China's Re-education Camps in Xinjiang [Audio]Dr Rachel Harris, Professor Jude Howell, Dr Rian Thumhttp://www.tigerscanswim.com/newsAndMedia/videoAndAudio/channels/publicLecturesAndEvents/player.aspx?id=465301:28:58PD7284Speaker(s): Dr Rachel Harris, Professor Jude Howell, Dr Rian Thum | Large numbers of Uyghurs have been detained by the Chinese government in re-education camps. What do we know about these camps? Rachel Harris specialises in Uyghur culture and religion and is based at SOAS. Jude Howell is an expert on authoritarianism and Professor of International Development at LSE. Rian Thum is a historian of Xinjiang based at the University of Nottingham. Hans Steinmuller is Assistant Professor in the Department of Anthropology at LSE. LSE Anthropology (@LSEAnthropology) is world famous and world leading. We are ranked top Anthropology department in the Guardian League Tables 2018. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEXinjiangSpeaker(s): Dr Rachel Harris, Professor Jude Howell, Dr Rian Thum | Large numbers of Uyghurs have been detained by the Chinese government in re-education camps. What do we know about these camps? Rachel Harris specialises in Uyghur culture and religion and is based at SOAS. Jude Howell is an expert on authoritarianism and Professor of International Development at LSE. Rian Thum is a historian of Xinjiang based at the University of Nottingham. Hans Steinmuller is Assistant Professor in the Department of Anthropology at LSE. LSE Anthropology (@LSEAnthropology) is world famous and world leading. We are ranked top Anthropology department in the Guardian League Tables 2018. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEXinjiangTue, 12 Mar 2019 18:30:00 GMT35 Liquidity and Leverage - The Two Faces of Liquidity [Audio]Professor Raghuram Rajanhttp://www.tigerscanswim.com/newsAndMedia/videoAndAudio/channels/publicLecturesAndEvents/player.aspx?id=465201:29:13PD7283Speaker(s): Professor Raghuram Rajan | Lionel Robbins was one of the outstanding men of his time; economist, public servant and supporter of the arts. The lectures, which were established in his name, take place each year and are a major event in the life of the School, featuring eminent economists from around the world. This year Raghuram Rajan, the Katherine Dusak Miller Distinguished Service Professor of Finance at Chicago Booth will deliver the Lionel Robbins Lectures. A bank's issuance of short-term demandable or overnight claims in order to finance illiquid loans leads to panics. Since the dawn of banking in Assyria and Sumeria, long before we had central banks, deposit insurance, or a tax advantage to debt, banks have had this structure, and critics have been troubled by it, as they are today. Professor Rajan will argue that this structure of banks - financing illiquid loans with short term or demandable debt - is not just a bug in the system, it is also a feature. This talk will focus on why anticipation of high liquidity can be detrimental for the financial system, increasing leverage, the system's dependence on the liquidity materializing, and lowering good governance practices. Raghuram Rajan was the 23rd Governor of the Reserve Bank of India between September 2013 and September 2016. Between 2003 and 2006, Dr. Rajan was the Chief Economist and Director of Research at the International Monetary Fund. The first of this years Lionel Robbins Lectures will take place on Monday 11 March. Established at LSE in 1990 CEP is one of Europe's leading economic research centres. It addresses three related questions: How to foster growth? How to share growth? How to make growth sustainable?Speaker(s): Professor Raghuram Rajan | Lionel Robbins was one of the outstanding men of his time; economist, public servant and supporter of the arts. The lectures, which were established in his name, take place each year and are a major event in the life of the School, featuring eminent economists from around the world. This year Raghuram Rajan, the Katherine Dusak Miller Distinguished Service Professor of Finance at Chicago Booth will deliver the Lionel Robbins Lectures. A bank's issuance of short-term demandable or overnight claims in order to finance illiquid loans leads to panics. Since the dawn of banking in Assyria and Sumeria, long before we had central banks, deposit insurance, or a tax advantage to debt, banks have had this structure, and critics have been troubled by it, as they are today. Professor Rajan will argue that this structure of banks - financing illiquid loans with short term or demandable debt - is not just a bug in the system, it is also a feature. This talk will focus on why anticipation of high liquidity can be detrimental for the financial system, increasing leverage, the system's dependence on the liquidity materializing, and lowering good governance practices. Raghuram Rajan was the 23rd Governor of the Reserve Bank of India between September 2013 and September 2016. Between 2003 and 2006, Dr. Rajan was the Chief Economist and Director of Research at the International Monetary Fund. The first of this years Lionel Robbins Lectures will take place on Monday 11 March. Established at LSE in 1990 CEP is one of Europe's leading economic research centres. It addresses three related questions: How to foster growth? How to share growth? How to make growth sustainable?Tue, 12 Mar 2019 18:30:00 GMT36 Liquidity and Leverage - Why Banks? [Audio]Professor Raghuram Rajanhttp://www.tigerscanswim.com/newsAndMedia/videoAndAudio/channels/publicLecturesAndEvents/player.aspx?id=465101:25:12PD7282Speaker(s): Professor Raghuram Rajan | Lionel Robbins was one of the outstanding men of his time; economist, public servant and supporter of the arts. The lectures, which were established in his name, take place each year and are a major event in the life of the School, featuring eminent economists from around the world. This year Raghuram Rajan, the Katherine Dusak Miller Distinguished Service Professor of Finance at Chicago Booth will deliver the Lionel Robbins Lectures. A bank's issuance of short-term demandable or overnight claims in order to finance illiquid loans leads to panics. Since the dawn of banking in Assyria and Sumeria, long before we had central banks, deposit insurance, or a tax advantage to debt, banks have had this structure, and critics have been troubled by it, as they are today. Professor Rajan will argue that this structure of banks - financing illiquid loans with short term or demandable debt - is not just a bug in the system, it is also a feature. This lecture will focus on why banks have the structure they have - long term illiquid assets financed by short term runnable liabilities. It will explain why the risk of runs is inherent in the business of banking and cannot be eliminated without impinging on that business. Raghuram Rajan was the 23rd Governor of the Reserve Bank of India between September 2013 and September 2016. Between 2003 and 2006, Dr. Rajan was the Chief Economist and Director of Research at the International Monetary Fund. The second of this years Lionel Robbins Lectures will take place on Tuesday 12 March. Established at LSE in 1990 CEP is one of Europe's leading economic research centres. It addresses three related questions: How to foster growth? How to share growth? How to make growth sustainable?Speaker(s): Professor Raghuram Rajan | Lionel Robbins was one of the outstanding men of his time; economist, public servant and supporter of the arts. The lectures, which were established in his name, take place each year and are a major event in the life of the School, featuring eminent economists from around the world. This year Raghuram Rajan, the Katherine Dusak Miller Distinguished Service Professor of Finance at Chicago Booth will deliver the Lionel Robbins Lectures. A bank's issuance of short-term demandable or overnight claims in order to finance illiquid loans leads to panics. Since the dawn of banking in Assyria and Sumeria, long before we had central banks, deposit insurance, or a tax advantage to debt, banks have had this structure, and critics have been troubled by it, as they are today. Professor Rajan will argue that this structure of banks - financing illiquid loans with short term or demandable debt - is not just a bug in the system, it is also a feature. This lecture will focus on why banks have the structure they have - long term illiquid assets financed by short term runnable liabilities. It will explain why the risk of runs is inherent in the business of banking and cannot be eliminated without impinging on that business. Raghuram Rajan was the 23rd Governor of the Reserve Bank of India between September 2013 and September 2016. Between 2003 and 2006, Dr. Rajan was the Chief Economist and Director of Research at the International Monetary Fund. The second of this years Lionel Robbins Lectures will take place on Tuesday 12 March. Established at LSE in 1990 CEP is one of Europe's leading economic research centres. It addresses three related questions: How to foster growth? How to share growth? How to make growth sustainable?Mon, 11 Mar 2019 18:30:00 GMT37 Women in the City [Audio]Pavita Cooper, Bronwyn Curtis, Elisabeth Stheemanhttp://www.tigerscanswim.com/newsAndMedia/videoAndAudio/channels/publicLecturesAndEvents/player.aspx?id=465001:39:00PD7281Speaker(s): Pavita Cooper, Bronwyn Curtis, Elisabeth Stheeman | Three female leaders in business and finance share their experiences from their varied careers to mark International Women's Day. Pavita Cooper, Director of More Difference, will talk on women in finance, what has changed and what needs to change, talking in particular about the work of the 30 percent Club encouraging chairmen to appoint more women to their boards. Bronwyn Curtis, a member of the Office for Budget Responsibility, will speak on her career as a global financial economist who has served in senior executive positions in both the financial and media sectors. Elisabeth Stheeman, a member of the Bank of England's Financial Policy Committee and LSE Alum, will share her career journey and experience. She has worked in Financial Services and Real Estate for over 25years before moving to a "portfolio career" with a number of non-executive roles, both in the UK and in Continental Europe a few years ago. Grace Lordan is Associate Professor in the Department of Psychological and Behavioural Science at LSE. On International Women's Day 2019, LSE Library launches its series of activities around Women at Work to commemorate 100 years since the Sex Disqualification (Removal) Act. This Act removed the legal barriers of sex or marriage from official appointments and professional occupations, such as the legal profession. The Women's Library Collection in LSE Library is a rich source of information for and was formed out of the struggles encountered by women working in the professions after 1919. Our Women Work programme begins in Spring 2019 with a focus on areas of work that have only relatively recently appointed women to senior positions. The British Library of Political and Economic Science was founded in 1896, a year after the London School of Economics and Political Science. It has been based in the Lionel Robbins Building since 1978 and houses many world class collections, including The Women's Library.Speaker(s): Pavita Cooper, Bronwyn Curtis, Elisabeth Stheeman | Three female leaders in business and finance share their experiences from their varied careers to mark International Women's Day. Pavita Cooper, Director of More Difference, will talk on women in finance, what has changed and what needs to change, talking in particular about the work of the 30 percent Club encouraging chairmen to appoint more women to their boards. Bronwyn Curtis, a member of the Office for Budget Responsibility, will speak on her career as a global financial economist who has served in senior executive positions in both the financial and media sectors. Elisabeth Stheeman, a member of the Bank of England's Financial Policy Committee and LSE Alum, will share her career journey and experience. She has worked in Financial Services and Real Estate for over 25years before moving to a "portfolio career" with a number of non-executive roles, both in the UK and in Continental Europe a few years ago. Grace Lordan is Associate Professor in the Department of Psychological and Behavioural Science at LSE. On International Women's Day 2019, LSE Library launches its series of activities around Women at Work to commemorate 100 years since the Sex Disqualification (Removal) Act. This Act removed the legal barriers of sex or marriage from official appointments and professional occupations, such as the legal profession. The Women's Library Collection in LSE Library is a rich source of information for and was formed out of the struggles encountered by women working in the professions after 1919. Our Women Work programme begins in Spring 2019 with a focus on areas of work that have only relatively recently appointed women to senior positions. The British Library of Political and Economic Science was founded in 1896, a year after the London School of Economics and Political Science. It has been based in the Lionel Robbins Building since 1978 and houses many world class collections, including The Women's Library.Fri, 8 Mar 2019 18:30:00 GMT38 Decolonising the Curricula: why necessary and why now [Audio]Dr Simukai Chigudu, Dr Laura Mann, Dr Lyn Ossomehttp://www.tigerscanswim.com/newsAndMedia/videoAndAudio/channels/publicLecturesAndEvents/player.aspx?id=464901:34:09PD7280Speaker(s): Dr Simukai Chigudu, Dr Laura Mann, Dr Lyn Ossome | From Cape Town to Oxford and beyond, student movements across the world calling for education to be decolonised have gained prominence over the past few years. In fact, academics have been raising concerns about the foundation of Africa scholarship as far back as 1969 at an African Studies Association in the United States. Simukai Chigudu (@SimuChigudu) is Associate Professor of African Politics at the University of Oxford. Laura Mann (@balootiful) is Assistant Professor in the Department of International Development at LSE. Lyn Ossome is Senior Research Fellow in the Makerere Institute of Social Research at Makerere University. Alcinda Honwana is Centennial Professor at LSE based in the Firoz Lalji centre for Africa and the Department of International Development. She is also a Visiting Professor of Anthropology and International Development at the Open University, where she held a Chair in International Development. Based at LSE in Pethick-Lawrence House, the Firoz Lalji Centre for Africa (@AfricaAtLSE) promotes independent academic research and teaching; open and issue-oriented debate; and evidence-based policy making. The Centre accomplishes this by connecting different social science disciplines and by working in partnership with Africa bringing African voices to the global debate. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECitingAfrica This event forms part of the "New World (Dis)Orders" series, linked to the LSE Festival, a week-long series of events taking place from 25 February to 2 March 2019, free to attend and open to all, exploring how social science can tackle global issues. How did we get here? What are the challenges? And, importantly, how can we address them?Speaker(s): Dr Simukai Chigudu, Dr Laura Mann, Dr Lyn Ossome | From Cape Town to Oxford and beyond, student movements across the world calling for education to be decolonised have gained prominence over the past few years. In fact, academics have been raising concerns about the foundation of Africa scholarship as far back as 1969 at an African Studies Association in the United States. Simukai Chigudu (@SimuChigudu) is Associate Professor of African Politics at the University of Oxford. Laura Mann (@balootiful) is Assistant Professor in the Department of International Development at LSE. Lyn Ossome is Senior Research Fellow in the Makerere Institute of Social Research at Makerere University. Alcinda Honwana is Centennial Professor at LSE based in the Firoz Lalji centre for Africa and the Department of International Development. She is also a Visiting Professor of Anthropology and International Development at the Open University, where she held a Chair in International Development. Based at LSE in Pethick-Lawrence House, the Firoz Lalji Centre for Africa (@AfricaAtLSE) promotes independent academic research and teaching; open and issue-oriented debate; and evidence-based policy making. The Centre accomplishes this by connecting different social science disciplines and by working in partnership with Africa bringing African voices to the global debate. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECitingAfrica This event forms part of the "New World (Dis)Orders" series, linked to the LSE Festival, a week-long series of events taking place from 25 February to 2 March 2019, free to attend and open to all, exploring how social science can tackle global issues. How did we get here? What are the challenges? And, importantly, how can we address them?Wed, 6 Mar 2019 18:30:00 GMT39 Women Who Change Lives: social entrepreneurs on the move [Audio]Elise Do, Grace Olugbodi, Ana Maria Torreshttp://www.tigerscanswim.com/newsAndMedia/videoAndAudio/channels/publicLecturesAndEvents/player.aspx?id=465601:26:51PD7290Speaker(s): Elise Do, Grace Olugbodi, Ana Maria Torres | To mark International Women's Day, join us for a discussion on how female entrepreneurs are using social enterprise to change the world to provide opportunities for women and tackle inequalities. Inspiring female leaders speak frankly about their journey, motivations, purpose and business and share their golden nuggets for success. The last two years have seen women speak up around the world and support each other, resulting in a sense of solidarity that is stronger than ever today. Social enterprises are providing leadership opportunities for women in the UK, India, Pakistan, and the USA. But despite this, gender inequalities still remain among social entrepreneurs. HERA (Her Equality Rights and Autonomy) and LSE team up to present a panel of leaders, entrepreneurs and experts in business who will explore the world of social enterprise and the opportunities it can present. Elise Do is Chair of the Board of Trustees for HERA. Elise is an Associate Director of Merger and Acquisitions at Augusta and Co where she specialises in renewable energy investment banking. She spent 10 years at Rio Tinto as Chief of Staff to the Group CFO. Grace Olugbodi (@BeGenioCity) is founder of BeGenio and Easy Maths Skills, creator of the Race to Infinity Maths game and author of Make Maths Fun. Ana Maria Torres (@anamatorresmon) is co-founder of Hilo Sagrado and has more than 15 years' of experience in social impact working in more than 40 countries. She has been an advisor and consultant to governments, international organisations and NGOs. Nadia Millington is a Senior Lecturer in Practice and Deputy Director of LSE's MSc Social Innovation and Entrepreneurship. She had over 10 years' experience as a strategy consultant in the UK and Caribbean. The Department of Management (@LSEManagement) is a world class centre for education and research in business and management, ranked number 2 in the world for business and management studies. HERA (@HerEquality) provides entrepreneurship training, professional mentoring and grants to women survivors of human trafficking, violence and exploitation. Their programmes engage the business community to enable vulnerable women to achieve economic independence. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEWomenInSpeaker(s): Elise Do, Grace Olugbodi, Ana Maria Torres | To mark International Women's Day, join us for a discussion on how female entrepreneurs are using social enterprise to change the world to provide opportunities for women and tackle inequalities. Inspiring female leaders speak frankly about their journey, motivations, purpose and business and share their golden nuggets for success. The last two years have seen women speak up around the world and support each other, resulting in a sense of solidarity that is stronger than ever today. Social enterprises are providing leadership opportunities for women in the UK, India, Pakistan, and the USA. But despite this, gender inequalities still remain among social entrepreneurs. HERA (Her Equality Rights and Autonomy) and LSE team up to present a panel of leaders, entrepreneurs and experts in business who will explore the world of social enterprise and the opportunities it can present. Elise Do is Chair of the Board of Trustees for HERA. Elise is an Associate Director of Merger and Acquisitions at Augusta and Co where she specialises in renewable energy investment banking. She spent 10 years at Rio Tinto as Chief of Staff to the Group CFO. Grace Olugbodi (@BeGenioCity) is founder of BeGenio and Easy Maths Skills, creator of the Race to Infinity Maths game and author of Make Maths Fun. Ana Maria Torres (@anamatorresmon) is co-founder of Hilo Sagrado and has more than 15 years' of experience in social impact working in more than 40 countries. She has been an advisor and consultant to governments, international organisations and NGOs. Nadia Millington is a Senior Lecturer in Practice and Deputy Director of LSE's MSc Social Innovation and Entrepreneurship. She had over 10 years' experience as a strategy consultant in the UK and Caribbean. The Department of Management (@LSEManagement) is a world class centre for education and research in business and management, ranked number 2 in the world for business and management studies. HERA (@HerEquality) provides entrepreneurship training, professional mentoring and grants to women survivors of human trafficking, violence and exploitation. Their programmes engage the business community to enable vulnerable women to achieve economic independence. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEWomenInWed, 6 Mar 2019 18:30:00 GMT40 The Coming Asian Century: challenges for the West [Audio]Dr Yu Jie (Cherry), Dr Parag Khanna, Gideon Rachmanhttp://www.tigerscanswim.com/newsAndMedia/videoAndAudio/channels/publicLecturesAndEvents/player.aspx?id=465801:28:51PD7294Speaker(s): Dr Yu Jie (Cherry), Dr Parag Khanna, Gideon Rachman | This event marks the launch Parag Khanna's book, The Future is Asian: Global Order in the 21st Century. In the 19th century, the world was Europeanized. In the 20th century, it was Americanized. Now, in the 21st century, the world is being irreversibly Asianized. The "Asian Century" is even bigger than you think. Far greater than just China, the new Asian system taking shape is a multi-civilizational order spanning Saudi Arabia to Japan, and Russia to Australia-linking five billion people through trade, finance and infrastructure networks that together represent 40 percent of global GDP. China has taken a lead in building the new Silk Roads across Asia, but it will not lead it alone. Rather, Asia is returning to the stable multipolar order that existed long before European colonialism and American dominance, with India and Southeast Asia coming into their own as economic and strategic hubs. The world has gotten used to hearing "America First" — but is it ready for "Asia First"? Get ready to see the world, and the future, from the Asian point-of-view. Yu Jie (@Yu_JieC) is the China Research Fellow at Chatham House, focusing on the decision-making process of Chinese foreign policy as well as China's economic diplomacy. She speaks and writes frequently at major media outlets such as BBC and Financial Times and regularly briefs senior policy practitioners from the EU institutions, the UK Cabinet Office, and the Silk Road Fund in Beijing, as well as major corporates. Yu Jie has testified at the House of Commons Foreign Affairs Committee, and was also head of China Foresight at LSE IDEAS. Prior to LSE, she was a management consultant, specializing in Chinese state-owned enterprises investments in Europe and Chinese market entry strategies for European conglomerates at the London Office of Roland Berger Strategy Consultants. Dr Yu has been recognized as a 'Leading Woman' of the London School of Economics, and remains an associate of LSE IDEAS. Parag Khanna (@paragkhanna) is a global strategy advisor and author. He is Founder and Managing Partner of FutureMap, a data and scenario based strategic advisory firm. He is author of a trilogy of books on the future of world order beginning with The Second World: Empires and Influence in the New Global Order (2008), followed by How to Run the World: Charting a Course to the Next Renaissance (2011), and concluding with Connectography: Mapping the Future of Global Civilization (2016). He is also author of Technocracy in America: Rise of the Info-State (2017) and co-author of Hybrid Reality: Thriving in the Emerging Human-Technology Civilization (2012). In 2008, Parag was named one of Esquire’s "75 Most Influential People of the 21st Century," and featured in WIRED magazine's "Smart List." He holds a PhD from the London School of Economics and Political Science, and Bachelors and Masters degrees from the School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University. Gideon Rachman (@gideonrachman) is Chief Foreign Affairs Commentator at the Financial Times. LSE IDEAS (@lseideas) is LSE's foreign policy think tank. We connect academic knowledge of diplomacy and strategy with the people who use it Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEAsiaSpeaker(s): Dr Yu Jie (Cherry), Dr Parag Khanna, Gideon Rachman | This event marks the launch Parag Khanna's book, The Future is Asian: Global Order in the 21st Century. In the 19th century, the world was Europeanized. In the 20th century, it was Americanized. Now, in the 21st century, the world is being irreversibly Asianized. The "Asian Century" is even bigger than you think. Far greater than just China, the new Asian system taking shape is a multi-civilizational order spanning Saudi Arabia to Japan, and Russia to Australia-linking five billion people through trade, finance and infrastructure networks that together represent 40 percent of global GDP. China has taken a lead in building the new Silk Roads across Asia, but it will not lead it alone. Rather, Asia is returning to the stable multipolar order that existed long before European colonialism and American dominance, with India and Southeast Asia coming into their own as economic and strategic hubs. The world has gotten used to hearing "America First" — but is it ready for "Asia First"? Get ready to see the world, and the future, from the Asian point-of-view. Yu Jie (@Yu_JieC) is the China Research Fellow at Chatham House, focusing on the decision-making process of Chinese foreign policy as well as China's economic diplomacy. She speaks and writes frequently at major media outlets such as BBC and Financial Times and regularly briefs senior policy practitioners from the EU institutions, the UK Cabinet Office, and the Silk Road Fund in Beijing, as well as major corporates. Yu Jie has testified at the House of Commons Foreign Affairs Committee, and was also head of China Foresight at LSE IDEAS. Prior to LSE, she was a management consultant, specializing in Chinese state-owned enterprises investments in Europe and Chinese market entry strategies for European conglomerates at the London Office of Roland Berger Strategy Consultants. Dr Yu has been recognized as a 'Leading Woman' of the London School of Economics, and remains an associate of LSE IDEAS. Parag Khanna (@paragkhanna) is a global strategy advisor and author. He is Founder and Managing Partner of FutureMap, a data and scenario based strategic advisory firm. He is author of a trilogy of books on the future of world order beginning with The Second World: Empires and Influence in the New Global Order (2008), followed by How to Run the World: Charting a Course to the Next Renaissance (2011), and concluding with Connectography: Mapping the Future of Global Civilization (2016). He is also author of Technocracy in America: Rise of the Info-State (2017) and co-author of Hybrid Reality: Thriving in the Emerging Human-Technology Civilization (2012). In 2008, Parag was named one of Esquire’s "75 Most Influential People of the 21st Century," and featured in WIRED magazine's "Smart List." He holds a PhD from the London School of Economics and Political Science, and Bachelors and Masters degrees from the School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University. Gideon Rachman (@gideonrachman) is Chief Foreign Affairs Commentator at the Financial Times. LSE IDEAS (@lseideas) is LSE's foreign policy think tank. We connect academic knowledge of diplomacy and strategy with the people who use it Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEAsiaTue, 5 Mar 2019 18:30:00 GMT41 LSE Festival 2019 | New World Order 2035 [Audio]Dr Liam Kofi Bright, Dr Rebecca Elliott, Dr Barbara Fasolo, Dr Seeta Pe?a Gangadharan, Dr Ilka Gleibs and Dr George Lawsonhttp://www.tigerscanswim.com/newsAndMedia/videoAndAudio/channels/publicLecturesAndEvents/player.aspx?id=464701:30:49PD7278Speaker(s): Dr Liam Kofi Bright, Dr Rebecca Elliott, Dr Barbara Fasolo, Dr Seeta Pe?a Gangadharan, Dr Ilka Gleibs and Dr George Lawson | What will the world look like in the not too distant future? By 2035 how could the way we live, work, interact with each other and understand ourselves have changed? Join a panel of LSE academics for some informed speculation. Liam Kofi Bright is Assistant Professor in the Department of Philosophy, Logic, and Scientific Method at LSE. Rebecca Elliott is Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology at LSE. Barbara Fasolo is Associate Professor of Behavioural Science in the Department of Management at LSE. Seeta Pena Gangadharan is Assistant Professor in the Department of Media and Communications at LSE. Ilka Gleibs is Assistant Professor in Social and Organisational Psychology in the Department of Psychological and Behavioural Science at LSE. George Lawson is Associate Professor in the Department of International Relations at LSE. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #NewWorldDisorders This event is part of the LSE Festival: New World (Dis)Orders running from Monday 25 February to Saturday 2 March 2019, with a series of events exploring how social science can tackle global problems. The full programme will be online in January 2019.Speaker(s): Dr Liam Kofi Bright, Dr Rebecca Elliott, Dr Barbara Fasolo, Dr Seeta Pe?a Gangadharan, Dr Ilka Gleibs and Dr George Lawson | What will the world look like in the not too distant future? By 2035 how could the way we live, work, interact with each other and understand ourselves have changed? Join a panel of LSE academics for some informed speculation. Liam Kofi Bright is Assistant Professor in the Department of Philosophy, Logic, and Scientific Method at LSE. Rebecca Elliott is Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology at LSE. Barbara Fasolo is Associate Professor of Behavioural Science in the Department of Management at LSE. Seeta Pena Gangadharan is Assistant Professor in the Department of Media and Communications at LSE. Ilka Gleibs is Assistant Professor in Social and Organisational Psychology in the Department of Psychological and Behavioural Science at LSE. George Lawson is Associate Professor in the Department of International Relations at LSE. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #NewWorldDisorders This event is part of the LSE Festival: New World (Dis)Orders running from Monday 25 February to Saturday 2 March 2019, with a series of events exploring how social science can tackle global problems. The full programme will be online in January 2019.Sat, 2 Mar 2019 18:30:00 GMT42 LSE Festival 2019 | Borders and Walls [Audio]Dr Elena Barabantseva, Professor Bill Callahan, Xiaolu Guohttp://www.tigerscanswim.com/newsAndMedia/videoAndAudio/channels/publicLecturesAndEvents/player.aspx?id=463900:49:20PD7270Speaker(s): Dr Elena Barabantseva, Professor Bill Callahan, Xiaolu Guo | A screening and discussion of two short films by Elena Barabantseva, University of Manchester and Bill Callahan, LSE. A discussion will follow with Xiaolu Guo, an award-winning writer and filmmaker. Border People (14 min, 2018) Elena Barabantseva, University of Manchester How does the border enter and shape a family life? What does it mean to the people who cross the border for marriage? This film juxtaposes a personal story of Meihua, a Vietnamese Yao woman who married a Yao man in China, with the stories and ritual practices that the Yao elders pass on to the young generation amidst the Chinese state’s ambitious border development plans and ethnic revival strategies. Great Walls: Journeys from ideology to experience (28 min, 2019) Bill Callahan, London School of Economics and Political Science As Trump’s Wall and the Berlin Wall show, border walls are key sites of ideology: both Cold War ideology, and anti-immigrant ideology. This film uses the Great Wall of China to consider walls as sites of experience in every life. It juxtaposes archive clips of political leaders (JFK, Trump, Merkel) and ethnographic film of ordinary people to show how even US presidents feel something when they go to the Berlin Wall or the Great Wall. The film returns to the Trump Wall and the Great Wall to probe how walls can be sites of spectacular wonder in paradoxical personal experience. Dr Elena Barabantseva is a Senior Lecturer at the University of Manchester. Bill Callahan is Professor of International Relations in the Department of International Relations, LSE. Xiaolu Guo is a novelist and film maker. Her most recent film “5 Men and a Caravaggio” premiered at the London Film Festival (2018). Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #NewWorldDisorders This event is part of the LSE Festival: New World (Dis)Orders running from Monday 25 February to Saturday 2 March 2019, with a series of events exploring how social science can tackle global problems.Speaker(s): Dr Elena Barabantseva, Professor Bill Callahan, Xiaolu Guo | A screening and discussion of two short films by Elena Barabantseva, University of Manchester and Bill Callahan, LSE. A discussion will follow with Xiaolu Guo, an award-winning writer and filmmaker. Border People (14 min, 2018) Elena Barabantseva, University of Manchester How does the border enter and shape a family life? What does it mean to the people who cross the border for marriage? This film juxtaposes a personal story of Meihua, a Vietnamese Yao woman who married a Yao man in China, with the stories and ritual practices that the Yao elders pass on to the young generation amidst the Chinese state’s ambitious border development plans and ethnic revival strategies. Great Walls: Journeys from ideology to experience (28 min, 2019) Bill Callahan, London School of Economics and Political Science As Trump’s Wall and the Berlin Wall show, border walls are key sites of ideology: both Cold War ideology, and anti-immigrant ideology. This film uses the Great Wall of China to consider walls as sites of experience in every life. It juxtaposes archive clips of political leaders (JFK, Trump, Merkel) and ethnographic film of ordinary people to show how even US presidents feel something when they go to the Berlin Wall or the Great Wall. The film returns to the Trump Wall and the Great Wall to probe how walls can be sites of spectacular wonder in paradoxical personal experience. Dr Elena Barabantseva is a Senior Lecturer at the University of Manchester. Bill Callahan is Professor of International Relations in the Department of International Relations, LSE. Xiaolu Guo is a novelist and film maker. Her most recent film “5 Men and a Caravaggio” premiered at the London Film Festival (2018). Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #NewWorldDisorders This event is part of the LSE Festival: New World (Dis)Orders running from Monday 25 February to Saturday 2 March 2019, with a series of events exploring how social science can tackle global problems.Sat, 2 Mar 2019 16:30:00 GMT43 LSE Festival 2019 | Populism and Religion in the West [Audio]Tobias Cremer, Dr Zubaida Haquehttp://www.tigerscanswim.com/newsAndMedia/videoAndAudio/channels/publicLecturesAndEvents/player.aspx?id=464401:14:51PD7275Speaker(s): Tobias Cremer, Dr Zubaida Haque | In an apparently ever-less-religious West, how has Christian identity, however indirectly, been used as a focal point for populist discontent? Tobias Cremer (@cremer_tobias) is a PhD candidate at the Department of Politics and International Studies (POLIS) at Peterhouse, Cambridge. Funded by the Economic and Social Research Council his doctoral research focuses on the relationship between religion and the new wave of right-wing populism in Western Europe and North America. In particular, the project aims to understand the ways in which traditionally secularist right-wing populist parties are seeking to employ Christian symbols and language as cultural identity markers, and how believers and Church authorities are reacting to such co-optation attempts. Zubaida Haque (@Zubhaque) is the Deputy Director at The Runnymede Trust with a strong research and policy background in educational attainments, ethnic minorities and employment, equality within prisons, integration and extremism. She has worked for several government departments, think tanks and universities and has directly been involved in several national panels and commissions including two government-sponsored reviews of the ‘race riots’ in Britain. She has made regular appearances on Channel 4 News, Newsnight, BBC Breakfast, Sky News and Victoria Derbyshire as well as national and local radio stations. James Walters (@LSEChaplain) is the founding director of the LSE Faith Centre and leads its work in promoting religious literacy and interfaith leadership among the LSE’s global student body, in government and to the wider public. He is a Senior Lecturer in Practice at the LSE Marshall Institute for Philanthropy and an affiliated faculty member at the Department for International Development. He has recently published Loving Your Neighbour in an Age of Religious Conflict: A New Agenda for Interfaith Relations. LSE Religion and Global Society is a partnership between the LSE Faith Centre and LSE Institute of Global Affairs. Unfortunately due to unforeseen circumstances Anne Applebaum is no longer able to speak at this event. We apologize for any inconvenience caused. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #NewWorldDisorders This event is part of the LSE Festival: New World (Dis)Orders running from Monday 25 February to Saturday 2 March 2019, with a series of events exploring how social science can tackle global problems.Speaker(s): Tobias Cremer, Dr Zubaida Haque | In an apparently ever-less-religious West, how has Christian identity, however indirectly, been used as a focal point for populist discontent? Tobias Cremer (@cremer_tobias) is a PhD candidate at the Department of Politics and International Studies (POLIS) at Peterhouse, Cambridge. Funded by the Economic and Social Research Council his doctoral research focuses on the relationship between religion and the new wave of right-wing populism in Western Europe and North America. In particular, the project aims to understand the ways in which traditionally secularist right-wing populist parties are seeking to employ Christian symbols and language as cultural identity markers, and how believers and Church authorities are reacting to such co-optation attempts. Zubaida Haque (@Zubhaque) is the Deputy Director at The Runnymede Trust with a strong research and policy background in educational attainments, ethnic minorities and employment, equality within prisons, integration and extremism. She has worked for several government departments, think tanks and universities and has directly been involved in several national panels and commissions including two government-sponsored reviews of the ‘race riots’ in Britain. She has made regular appearances on Channel 4 News, Newsnight, BBC Breakfast, Sky News and Victoria Derbyshire as well as national and local radio stations. James Walters (@LSEChaplain) is the founding director of the LSE Faith Centre and leads its work in promoting religious literacy and interfaith leadership among the LSE’s global student body, in government and to the wider public. He is a Senior Lecturer in Practice at the LSE Marshall Institute for Philanthropy and an affiliated faculty member at the Department for International Development. He has recently published Loving Your Neighbour in an Age of Religious Conflict: A New Agenda for Interfaith Relations. LSE Religion and Global Society is a partnership between the LSE Faith Centre and LSE Institute of Global Affairs. Unfortunately due to unforeseen circumstances Anne Applebaum is no longer able to speak at this event. We apologize for any inconvenience caused. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #NewWorldDisorders This event is part of the LSE Festival: New World (Dis)Orders running from Monday 25 February to Saturday 2 March 2019, with a series of events exploring how social science can tackle global problems.Sat, 2 Mar 2019 16:30:00 GMT44 LSE Festival 2019 | Conspiracy Theory as Truth [Audio]Dr Bradley Franks, Dr Erica Lagalisse, Dr Matijs Pelkmanshttp://www.tigerscanswim.com/newsAndMedia/videoAndAudio/channels/publicLecturesAndEvents/player.aspx?id=464801:14:56PD7279Speaker(s): Dr Bradley Franks, Dr Erica Lagalisse, Dr Matijs Pelkmans | Psychologists and anthropologists explore how only some "conspiracy theories" fail tests of reason, and discuss the problems and potential of "conspiracy theory" for social movements. Erica Lagalisse is author of Occult Features of Anarchism - With Attention to the Conspiracy of Kings and the Conspiracy of the Peoples and Postdoctoral Fellow at the LSE International Inequalities Institute. Bradley Franks is Associate Professor in Psychology in the Department of Psychological and Behavioural Science, LSE. Matijs Pelkmans is Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology at LSE and a specialist in the anthropology of the Caucasus and Central Asia. Martin Bauer is Director of MSc Social and Public Communication and Professor of Social Psychology in the Department of Psychological and Behavioural Science, LSE. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #NewWorldDisorders This event is part of the LSE Festival: New World (Dis)Orders running from Monday 25 February to Saturday 2 March 2019, with a series of events exploring how social science can tackle global problems.Speaker(s): Dr Bradley Franks, Dr Erica Lagalisse, Dr Matijs Pelkmans | Psychologists and anthropologists explore how only some "conspiracy theories" fail tests of reason, and discuss the problems and potential of "conspiracy theory" for social movements. Erica Lagalisse is author of Occult Features of Anarchism - With Attention to the Conspiracy of Kings and the Conspiracy of the Peoples and Postdoctoral Fellow at the LSE International Inequalities Institute. Bradley Franks is Associate Professor in Psychology in the Department of Psychological and Behavioural Science, LSE. Matijs Pelkmans is Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology at LSE and a specialist in the anthropology of the Caucasus and Central Asia. Martin Bauer is Director of MSc Social and Public Communication and Professor of Social Psychology in the Department of Psychological and Behavioural Science, LSE. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #NewWorldDisorders This event is part of the LSE Festival: New World (Dis)Orders running from Monday 25 February to Saturday 2 March 2019, with a series of events exploring how social science can tackle global problems.Sat, 2 Mar 2019 14:30:00 GMT45 LSE Festival 2019 | Protesting Inequalities [Audio]Bird la Bird, Dr Aviah Sarah Day, Dr Armine Ishkanian, Professor Tomila Lankina, Dr Olga Onuchhttp://www.tigerscanswim.com/newsAndMedia/videoAndAudio/channels/publicLecturesAndEvents/player.aspx?id=464100:55:42PD7271Speaker(s): Bird la Bird, Dr Aviah Sarah Day, Dr Armine Ishkanian, Professor Tomila Lankina, Dr Olga Onuch | This event examines the changing dynamics of protests and protest movements, focusing on how activists in the UK and globally mobilize and fight against inequalities. Bird la Bird is a performance artist who straddles historiography, comedy, queer and politics. She has been described as a Queer Pearly Queen and a Haute Couture Fishwife. Bird la Bird has recently developed a series of performances interrogating the histories of Britain’s key cultural institutions, queering the chronicles and unpicking the layers of colonialism, class oppression, poverty and homophobia on which they were built. The resulting performances are highly accessible, inclusive, emotional and entertaining as Bird encourages the audience to shake the foundations of the museum by bringing hidden histories to the forefront. Aviah Sarah Day came to grassroots activism out of necessity. After a childhood in and out of the care system followed a period of homelessness with her mother and brother, Aviah became interested in anti-capitalism as resistance to her poverty. Over the last 10 years she has been involved in UK Uncut, Focus E15 and Sisters Uncut fighting racism, sexism and capitalism. Armine Ishkanian is Associate Professor and the Programme Director of the MSc in International Social and Public Policy (ISPP). Her research examines the relationship between civil society, democracy, development, and social transformation. She has examined how civil society organisations and social movements engage in policy processes and transformative politics in a number of countries including Armenia, Egypt, Greece, and the UK. Tomila Lankina is Professor of Politics and International Relations at the LSE’s International Relations Department. Her current research focuses on comparative democracy and authoritarianism, mass protests and historical patterns of human capital and democratic reproduction in Russia and other states. Dr Olga Onuch is Associate Professor in Politics at the University of Manchester. Onuch’s comparative study of protest (as well as elections, migration & identity) in Eastern Europe and Latin America has made her a leading expert in Ukrainian and Argentine politics specifically, but also in inter-regional comparative analysis. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #NewWorldDisorders This event is part of the LSE Festival: New World (Dis)Orders running from Monday 25 February to Saturday 2 March 2019, with a series of events exploring how social science can tackle global problems. The full programme will be online in January 2019.Speaker(s): Bird la Bird, Dr Aviah Sarah Day, Dr Armine Ishkanian, Professor Tomila Lankina, Dr Olga Onuch | This event examines the changing dynamics of protests and protest movements, focusing on how activists in the UK and globally mobilize and fight against inequalities. Bird la Bird is a performance artist who straddles historiography, comedy, queer and politics. She has been described as a Queer Pearly Queen and a Haute Couture Fishwife. Bird la Bird has recently developed a series of performances interrogating the histories of Britain’s key cultural institutions, queering the chronicles and unpicking the layers of colonialism, class oppression, poverty and homophobia on which they were built. The resulting performances are highly accessible, inclusive, emotional and entertaining as Bird encourages the audience to shake the foundations of the museum by bringing hidden histories to the forefront. Aviah Sarah Day came to grassroots activism out of necessity. After a childhood in and out of the care system followed a period of homelessness with her mother and brother, Aviah became interested in anti-capitalism as resistance to her poverty. Over the last 10 years she has been involved in UK Uncut, Focus E15 and Sisters Uncut fighting racism, sexism and capitalism. Armine Ishkanian is Associate Professor and the Programme Director of the MSc in International Social and Public Policy (ISPP). Her research examines the relationship between civil society, democracy, development, and social transformation. She has examined how civil society organisations and social movements engage in policy processes and transformative politics in a number of countries including Armenia, Egypt, Greece, and the UK. Tomila Lankina is Professor of Politics and International Relations at the LSE’s International Relations Department. Her current research focuses on comparative democracy and authoritarianism, mass protests and historical patterns of human capital and democratic reproduction in Russia and other states. Dr Olga Onuch is Associate Professor in Politics at the University of Manchester. Onuch’s comparative study of protest (as well as elections, migration & identity) in Eastern Europe and Latin America has made her a leading expert in Ukrainian and Argentine politics specifically, but also in inter-regional comparative analysis. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #NewWorldDisorders This event is part of the LSE Festival: New World (Dis)Orders running from Monday 25 February to Saturday 2 March 2019, with a series of events exploring how social science can tackle global problems. The full programme will be online in January 2019.Sat, 2 Mar 2019 14:30:00 GMT46 LSE Festival 2019 | Art and Conflict [Audio]Dr Denisa Kostovicova, Dr Nela Milic, Tom Paskhalis, Dr Ivor Sokoli?http://www.tigerscanswim.com/newsAndMedia/videoAndAudio/channels/publicLecturesAndEvents/player.aspx?id=464201:16:40PD7272Speaker(s): Dr Denisa Kostovicova, Dr Nela Milic, Tom Paskhalis, Dr Ivor Sokoli? | The panellists will discuss the role of art and visual representation in response to conflict and dealing with its consequences. Text Illuminations is an art installation by artist Nela Milic of the University of the Arts London (UAL) produced through inter-disciplinary collaboration with political scientists Dr Denisa Kostovicova, Dr Ivor Sokolic and Tom Paskhalis of the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE). This artwork is an interactive representation of a search for the meaning of reconciliation after mass atrocity through debates including people from all ethnic groups involved in a decade of conflicts in the Balkans. The artist and the political scientists join together to discuss the process of interdisciplinary collaboration to convert quantitative text analysis into art. The exhibition is part of a major AHRC-funded project, ‘Art & Reconciliation: Conflict, Culture and Community’, led by King’s in collaboration with the University of the Arts London and the London School of Economics. The work will be contextualised in relation to the early findings of a DFID-funded project, the Conflict Research Programme, led by LSE, which explores conflict in relation to notions of identity, civicness and the political marketplace. Contemporary conflicts often combine attacks on civil society, culture and cultural heritage. The panel will also explore how, in responding to this civicness, art and the defence of cultural heritage can come together. Denisa Kostovicova is an Associate Professor in Global Politics at the European Institute and the Department of Government at the London School of Economics and Political Science. She studies post-conflict reconstruction and transitional justice with a particular interest in the bottom-up perspective on transitions from war to peace. Nela Milic is an artist and an academic working in media and arts, and is Senior Lecturer and Year 2 Contextual and Theoretical Studies Coordinator in the Design School at London College of Communication. Tom Paskhalis is a PhD candidate at the Department of Methodology, LSE. His research is focussed on comparative politics and the development and application of new approaches to quantitative text analysis. Dr Ivor Sokoli? is a Research Officer at the European Institute at the London School of Economics and Political Science. He works on the ERC funded project “Justice Interactions and Peacebuilding: From Static to Dynamic Discourses across National, Ethnic, Gender and Age Groups”. Denisa Kostovicova, Ivor Sokolic, Tom Paskhalis and Nela Milic discuss the process of interdisciplinary collaboration, which turned a political science method into an art installation in their blog piece Text Illuminations: From the Method to the Artefact. Henry Radice is a Reseach Fellow in the Department of International Development, LSE. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #NewWorldDisorders This event is part of the LSE Festival: New World (Dis)Orders running from Monday 25 February to Saturday 2 March 2019, with a series of events exploring how social science can tackle global problems.Speaker(s): Dr Denisa Kostovicova, Dr Nela Milic, Tom Paskhalis, Dr Ivor Sokoli? | The panellists will discuss the role of art and visual representation in response to conflict and dealing with its consequences. Text Illuminations is an art installation by artist Nela Milic of the University of the Arts London (UAL) produced through inter-disciplinary collaboration with political scientists Dr Denisa Kostovicova, Dr Ivor Sokolic and Tom Paskhalis of the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE). This artwork is an interactive representation of a search for the meaning of reconciliation after mass atrocity through debates including people from all ethnic groups involved in a decade of conflicts in the Balkans. The artist and the political scientists join together to discuss the process of interdisciplinary collaboration to convert quantitative text analysis into art. The exhibition is part of a major AHRC-funded project, ‘Art & Reconciliation: Conflict, Culture and Community’, led by King’s in collaboration with the University of the Arts London and the London School of Economics. The work will be contextualised in relation to the early findings of a DFID-funded project, the Conflict Research Programme, led by LSE, which explores conflict in relation to notions of identity, civicness and the political marketplace. Contemporary conflicts often combine attacks on civil society, culture and cultural heritage. The panel will also explore how, in responding to this civicness, art and the defence of cultural heritage can come together. Denisa Kostovicova is an Associate Professor in Global Politics at the European Institute and the Department of Government at the London School of Economics and Political Science. She studies post-conflict reconstruction and transitional justice with a particular interest in the bottom-up perspective on transitions from war to peace. Nela Milic is an artist and an academic working in media and arts, and is Senior Lecturer and Year 2 Contextual and Theoretical Studies Coordinator in the Design School at London College of Communication. Tom Paskhalis is a PhD candidate at the Department of Methodology, LSE. His research is focussed on comparative politics and the development and application of new approaches to quantitative text analysis. Dr Ivor Sokoli? is a Research Officer at the European Institute at the London School of Economics and Political Science. He works on the ERC funded project “Justice Interactions and Peacebuilding: From Static to Dynamic Discourses across National, Ethnic, Gender and Age Groups”. Denisa Kostovicova, Ivor Sokolic, Tom Paskhalis and Nela Milic discuss the process of interdisciplinary collaboration, which turned a political science method into an art installation in their blog piece Text Illuminations: From the Method to the Artefact. Henry Radice is a Reseach Fellow in the Department of International Development, LSE. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #NewWorldDisorders This event is part of the LSE Festival: New World (Dis)Orders running from Monday 25 February to Saturday 2 March 2019, with a series of events exploring how social science can tackle global problems.Sat, 2 Mar 2019 12:45:00 GMT47 LSE Festival 2019 | What Does It Mean to Be British and Who Defines It? [Audio]Diane Abbott MP, Sunder Katwala, Professor Eric Kaufmann, Dr Alita Nandihttp://www.tigerscanswim.com/newsAndMedia/videoAndAudio/channels/publicLecturesAndEvents/player.aspx?id=464301:11:55PD7273Speaker(s): Diane Abbott MP, Sunder Katwala, Professor Eric Kaufmann, Dr Alita Nandi | This interactive public event comprises a panel-based discussion, with representatives from different influential spheres in society who are shaping discourse on British identity, combined with direct audience engagement. Diane Abbott (@HackneyAbbott) is MP for Hackney North and Stoke Newington and is the Shadow Home Secretary. Sunder Katwala (@sundersays) is the director of British Future. He has previously worked as a journalist. Eric Kaufmann (@epkaufm) is Professor of Politics at Birkbeck College, University of London. Dr Alita Nandi (@alitanandi ) is Research Fellow at the University of Essex, who carries out research on the formation and measurement of British, ethnic and other social identities and their consequences. Dr Ilka Gleibs (@Dr_Ilka_Gleibs) is Assistant Professor at the London School of Economics in the Department of Psychological and Behavioural Science. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #NewWorldDisorders This event is part of the LSE Festival: New World (Dis)Orders running from Monday 25 February to Saturday 2 March 2019, with a series of events exploring how social science can tackle global problems.Speaker(s): Diane Abbott MP, Sunder Katwala, Professor Eric Kaufmann, Dr Alita Nandi | This interactive public event comprises a panel-based discussion, with representatives from different influential spheres in society who are shaping discourse on British identity, combined with direct audience engagement. Diane Abbott (@HackneyAbbott) is MP for Hackney North and Stoke Newington and is the Shadow Home Secretary. Sunder Katwala (@sundersays) is the director of British Future. He has previously worked as a journalist. Eric Kaufmann (@epkaufm) is Professor of Politics at Birkbeck College, University of London. Dr Alita Nandi (@alitanandi ) is Research Fellow at the University of Essex, who carries out research on the formation and measurement of British, ethnic and other social identities and their consequences. Dr Ilka Gleibs (@Dr_Ilka_Gleibs) is Assistant Professor at the London School of Economics in the Department of Psychological and Behavioural Science. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #NewWorldDisorders This event is part of the LSE Festival: New World (Dis)Orders running from Monday 25 February to Saturday 2 March 2019, with a series of events exploring how social science can tackle global problems.Sat, 2 Mar 2019 12:45:00 GMT48 LSE Festival 2019 | Brave New World [Audio]Professor Richard Ashcroft, Professor David Healy, Professor Emily Jacksonhttp://www.tigerscanswim.com/newsAndMedia/videoAndAudio/channels/publicLecturesAndEvents/player.aspx?id=463801:17:26PD7268Speaker(s): Professor Richard Ashcroft, Professor David Healy, Professor Emily Jackson | In this age of utopian technologies, we can design mechanical limbs for amputees and chemically engineer happiness for depressives. But should we? From the fluoride in our water to genetically modified babies, scientific advances pose complex new ethical questions. We ask discuss the major bioethical issues of our time. Is philosophy braced for this brave new world? Are scientists and engineers morally obliged to design a utopia? Or are things best left to ‘nature’? Richard Ashcroft is Professor of Bioethics at Queen Mary University of London. David Healy (@DrDavidHealy) is Professor of Psychiatry, at Bangor University. Emily Jackson is Professor of Law at the London School of Economics. Shahidha Bari (@ShahidhaBari) is a Fellow of the Forum for Philosophy and Senior Lecturer in Romanticism at Queen Mary University of London. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #NewWorldDisorders This event is part of the LSE Festival: New World (Dis)Orders running from Monday 25 February to Saturday 2 March 2019, with a series of events exploring how social science can tackle global problems.Speaker(s): Professor Richard Ashcroft, Professor David Healy, Professor Emily Jackson | In this age of utopian technologies, we can design mechanical limbs for amputees and chemically engineer happiness for depressives. But should we? From the fluoride in our water to genetically modified babies, scientific advances pose complex new ethical questions. We ask discuss the major bioethical issues of our time. Is philosophy braced for this brave new world? Are scientists and engineers morally obliged to design a utopia? Or are things best left to ‘nature’? Richard Ashcroft is Professor of Bioethics at Queen Mary University of London. David Healy (@DrDavidHealy) is Professor of Psychiatry, at Bangor University. Emily Jackson is Professor of Law at the London School of Economics. Shahidha Bari (@ShahidhaBari) is a Fellow of the Forum for Philosophy and Senior Lecturer in Romanticism at Queen Mary University of London. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #NewWorldDisorders This event is part of the LSE Festival: New World (Dis)Orders running from Monday 25 February to Saturday 2 March 2019, with a series of events exploring how social science can tackle global problems.Sat, 2 Mar 2019 11:00:00 GMT49 LSE Festival 2019 | Putin's Russia and its Challenge to the Postwar Liberal Order [Audio]Bridget Kendallhttp://www.tigerscanswim.com/newsAndMedia/videoAndAudio/channels/publicLecturesAndEvents/player.aspx?id=463701:06:20PD7267Speaker(s): Bridget Kendall | Former BBC Correspondent, Bridget Kendall was appointed the first female Master of Peterhouse, the University of Cambridge's oldest College, in 2016. Educated at Oxford and Harvard, she joined the BBC World Service in 1983 and became the BBC's Moscow correspondent in 1989, covering the collapse of the Soviet Union as well as Boris Yeltsin's rise to power. She was then appointed Washington Correspondent before moving to the senior role of BBC Diplomatic Correspondent, reporting on major conflicts such as those in Kosovo, Iraq, Afghanistan, Libya, Syria and Ukraine. Her interviews with global leaders include Margaret Thatcher, Hillary Clinton, Mikhail Gorbachev and Vladimir Putin. Among her awards are the James Cameron Award for distinguished journalism and an MBE from Her Majesty the Queen in the 1994 New Year's Honours list. She is host of the BBC radio's weekly discussion programme, The Forum. Minouche Shafik is Director of the London School of Economics and Political Science. Prior to this she was Deputy Governor of the Bank of England. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #NewWorldDisorders This event is part of the LSE Festival: New World (Dis)Orders running from Monday 25 February to Saturday 2 March 2019, with a series of events exploring how social science can tackle global problems.Speaker(s): Bridget Kendall | Former BBC Correspondent, Bridget Kendall was appointed the first female Master of Peterhouse, the University of Cambridge's oldest College, in 2016. Educated at Oxford and Harvard, she joined the BBC World Service in 1983 and became the BBC's Moscow correspondent in 1989, covering the collapse of the Soviet Union as well as Boris Yeltsin's rise to power. She was then appointed Washington Correspondent before moving to the senior role of BBC Diplomatic Correspondent, reporting on major conflicts such as those in Kosovo, Iraq, Afghanistan, Libya, Syria and Ukraine. Her interviews with global leaders include Margaret Thatcher, Hillary Clinton, Mikhail Gorbachev and Vladimir Putin. Among her awards are the James Cameron Award for distinguished journalism and an MBE from Her Majesty the Queen in the 1994 New Year's Honours list. She is host of the BBC radio's weekly discussion programme, The Forum. Minouche Shafik is Director of the London School of Economics and Political Science. Prior to this she was Deputy Governor of the Bank of England. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #NewWorldDisorders This event is part of the LSE Festival: New World (Dis)Orders running from Monday 25 February to Saturday 2 March 2019, with a series of events exploring how social science can tackle global problems.Fri, 1 Mar 2019 19:30:00 GMT50 LSE Festival 2019 | Reliving the Origins of Totalitarianism [Audio]Professor Robert Eaglestone, Professor Lyndsey Stonebridgehttp://www.tigerscanswim.com/newsAndMedia/videoAndAudio/channels/publicLecturesAndEvents/player.aspx?id=463600:56:21PD7266Speaker(s): Professor Robert Eaglestone, Professor Lyndsey Stonebridge | Hannah Arendt’s seminal study of the preconditions for, and rise of, Nazism and Stalinism in the first half of the 20th Century has some chilling resonances with the world we are living in today. How can her analysis help us understand the state of global politics today? Robert Eaglestone (@BobEaglestone) is Professor of Contemporary Literature and Thought at Royal Holloway, University of London. Lyndsey Stonebridge (@LyndseyStonebri) is Professor of Humanities and Human Rights at the Department of English Literature/IRiS, University of Birmingham. Sandra Jovchelovitch is Professor of Social Psychology at the Department of Psychological and Behavioural Science, LSE. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #NewWorldDisorders This event is part of the LSE Festival: New World (Dis)Orders running from Monday 25 February to Saturday 2 March 2019, with a series of events exploring how social science can tackle global problems. The full programme will be online in January 2019.Speaker(s): Professor Robert Eaglestone, Professor Lyndsey Stonebridge | Hannah Arendt’s seminal study of the preconditions for, and rise of, Nazism and Stalinism in the first half of the 20th Century has some chilling resonances with the world we are living in today. How can her analysis help us understand the state of global politics today? Robert Eaglestone (@BobEaglestone) is Professor of Contemporary Literature and Thought at Royal Holloway, University of London. Lyndsey Stonebridge (@LyndseyStonebri) is Professor of Humanities and Human Rights at the Department of English Literature/IRiS, University of Birmingham. Sandra Jovchelovitch is Professor of Social Psychology at the Department of Psychological and Behavioural Science, LSE. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #NewWorldDisorders This event is part of the LSE Festival: New World (Dis)Orders running from Monday 25 February to Saturday 2 March 2019, with a series of events exploring how social science can tackle global problems. The full programme will be online in January 2019.Fri, 1 Mar 2019 13:15:00 GMT51 LSE Festival 2019 | Developing Urban Futures [Audio]Professor Jo Beall, Professor Ricky Burdett, Professor Alcinda Honwana, Dr Philipp Rodehttp://www.tigerscanswim.com/newsAndMedia/videoAndAudio/channels/publicLecturesAndEvents/player.aspx?id=464601:06:03PD7277Speaker(s): Professor Jo Beall, Professor Ricky Burdett, Professor Alcinda Honwana, Dr Philipp Rode | Following on from the Developing Urban Futures Urban Age Conference orgainised by LSE Cities in Addis Ababa in November 2018, this event will explore urban dynamics in rapidly changing Sub-Saharan African cities, and discuss how current models of planning and governance succeed or fail, addressing specific urban conditions on the ground. Continuing population growth and urbanisation will add 2.5 billion more people to the world's cities by 2050, with nearly 90 per cent of the increase concentrated in Asia and Africa. Today, around 40 per cent of Africans are urban dwellers, about 500 million people. In the next few decades this number will swell to over 1.4 billion. Ethiopia is moving at great pace from a predominantly rural economy to an urban one, with Addis Ababa growing at an annual rate of about 4 percent - twice the rate of Beijing or Jakarta. Estimates suggest that two-thirds of the investments in urban infrastructure to 2050 have yet to be made and decisions taken now will affect generations of city dwellers well into the 21st century. The event will draw on recent comparative research by the Urban Age Programme across Sub-Saharan African cities including Addis Ababa, Lagos, Kampala and LSE Cities' research on the governance of transport and sanitation infrastructure in the Ethiopian cities of Addis Ababa and Dire Dawa. Understanding the boundaries between infrastructure systems tends to be neglected in urban research. Yet it is here, at these infrastructure interfaces, where many critical questions for cities arise: who governs, who decides, who funds, who connects? Jo Beall (@JoBeall1) is Director Cultural Engagement at the British Council and a Professorial Research Fellow at the LSE. Professor Beall has conducted research in Africa and Asia on urban development and governance as well as cities in situations of conflict and state fragility. She is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and was recently awarded an Honorary Doctorate by the Open University. Ricky Burdett (@BURDETTR) is Professor of Urban Studies at LSE and Director of the Urban Age and LSE Cities. He sits on the Mayor of London's Cultural Leadership Board, and was a member of the UK Government Airport Commission (2012-2015); Chief Adviser on Architecture and Urbanism for the 2012 London Olympics; and Architecture and Urbanism Adviser to the Mayor of London (2001-2006). Alcinda Honwana is a Centennial Professor at LSE based in the Firoz Lalji centre for Africa and the Department of International Development. She is also a Visiting Professor of Anthropology and International Development at the Open University, where she held a Chair in International Development and has been an Inter-regional Adviser on social development policy at the United Nations. Philipp Rode (@PhilippRode) is Executive Director of LSE Cities and Co-Director of the Executive MSc in Cities at the London School of Economics and Political Science. He has been directing interdisciplinary projects comprising urban governance, transport, city planning and urban design at the LSE since 2003 and is a member of the Board of Directors of the Institute for Transportation and Development Policy (ITDP). Susan Parnell co-founded the African Centre for Cities. She has been actively involved in local, national and global urban policy debates around the 2030 Sustainable Development Goal and is an active advocate for better science policy engagement on cities. Recent books include Building a Capable State: Post Apartheid Service Delivery (Zed, 2017) and The Urban Planet (Cambridge, 2017).Speaker(s): Professor Jo Beall, Professor Ricky Burdett, Professor Alcinda Honwana, Dr Philipp Rode | Following on from the Developing Urban Futures Urban Age Conference orgainised by LSE Cities in Addis Ababa in November 2018, this event will explore urban dynamics in rapidly changing Sub-Saharan African cities, and discuss how current models of planning and governance succeed or fail, addressing specific urban conditions on the ground. Continuing population growth and urbanisation will add 2.5 billion more people to the world's cities by 2050, with nearly 90 per cent of the increase concentrated in Asia and Africa. Today, around 40 per cent of Africans are urban dwellers, about 500 million people. In the next few decades this number will swell to over 1.4 billion. Ethiopia is moving at great pace from a predominantly rural economy to an urban one, with Addis Ababa growing at an annual rate of about 4 percent - twice the rate of Beijing or Jakarta. Estimates suggest that two-thirds of the investments in urban infrastructure to 2050 have yet to be made and decisions taken now will affect generations of city dwellers well into the 21st century. The event will draw on recent comparative research by the Urban Age Programme across Sub-Saharan African cities including Addis Ababa, Lagos, Kampala and LSE Cities' research on the governance of transport and sanitation infrastructure in the Ethiopian cities of Addis Ababa and Dire Dawa. Understanding the boundaries between infrastructure systems tends to be neglected in urban research. Yet it is here, at these infrastructure interfaces, where many critical questions for cities arise: who governs, who decides, who funds, who connects? Jo Beall (@JoBeall1) is Director Cultural Engagement at the British Council and a Professorial Research Fellow at the LSE. Professor Beall has conducted research in Africa and Asia on urban development and governance as well as cities in situations of conflict and state fragility. She is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and was recently awarded an Honorary Doctorate by the Open University. Ricky Burdett (@BURDETTR) is Professor of Urban Studies at LSE and Director of the Urban Age and LSE Cities. He sits on the Mayor of London's Cultural Leadership Board, and was a member of the UK Government Airport Commission (2012-2015); Chief Adviser on Architecture and Urbanism for the 2012 London Olympics; and Architecture and Urbanism Adviser to the Mayor of London (2001-2006). Alcinda Honwana is a Centennial Professor at LSE based in the Firoz Lalji centre for Africa and the Department of International Development. She is also a Visiting Professor of Anthropology and International Development at the Open University, where she held a Chair in International Development and has been an Inter-regional Adviser on social development policy at the United Nations. Philipp Rode (@PhilippRode) is Executive Director of LSE Cities and Co-Director of the Executive MSc in Cities at the London School of Economics and Political Science. He has been directing interdisciplinary projects comprising urban governance, transport, city planning and urban design at the LSE since 2003 and is a member of the Board of Directors of the Institute for Transportation and Development Policy (ITDP). Susan Parnell co-founded the African Centre for Cities. She has been actively involved in local, national and global urban policy debates around the 2030 Sustainable Development Goal and is an active advocate for better science policy engagement on cities. Recent books include Building a Capable State: Post Apartheid Service Delivery (Zed, 2017) and The Urban Planet (Cambridge, 2017).Thu, 28 Feb 2019 19:00:00 GMT52 LSE Festival 2019 | The Haunting of Neo-liberalism [Audio]Professor Robert Eaglestone, Professor Simon Glendinning, Professor Maja Zehfusshttp://www.tigerscanswim.com/newsAndMedia/videoAndAudio/channels/publicLecturesAndEvents/player.aspx?id=463500:54:33PD7265Speaker(s): Professor Robert Eaglestone, Professor Simon Glendinning, Professor Maja Zehfuss | Marx famously wrote of the spectre of communism haunting Europe in the nineteenth century, and the end of the Cold War might be considered to mark its exorcism. But has communism really been laid to rest? Despite the fall of the Berlin Wall, Derrida certainly thought not. He argued that in the ‘new world disorder’, ideologies like neo-liberalism were enmeshed with communism, haunted by the spectre of communisms yet to come. Is Derrida’s analysis still applicable to the post-9/11 world? And have new spectres appeared in our midst? Robert Eaglestone (@BobEaglestone) is Professor of Contemporary Literature and Thought at Royal Holloway, University of London. Simon Glendinning(@lonanglo) is Professor of European Philosophy, London School of Economics. Maja Zehfuss is Professor of International Politics, University of Manchester Danielle Sands (@DanielleCSands) is a Fellow at the Forum for Philosophy & Lecturer in Comparative Literature and Culture, Royal Holloway, University of London. This event is co-organised by the European Institute and the Forum for Philiosophy. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. The Forum for Philosophy (@ForumPhilosophy) is an educational charity that organises a full and varied programme of philosophy and interdisciplinary events in the UK. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #New WorldDisorders This event is part of the LSE Festival: New World (Dis)Orders running from Monday 25 February to Saturday 2 March 2019, with a series of events exploring how social science can tackle global problems. From time to time there are changes to event details so we strongly recommend that if you plan to attend this event you check back on this listing on the day of the event.Speaker(s): Professor Robert Eaglestone, Professor Simon Glendinning, Professor Maja Zehfuss | Marx famously wrote of the spectre of communism haunting Europe in the nineteenth century, and the end of the Cold War might be considered to mark its exorcism. But has communism really been laid to rest? Despite the fall of the Berlin Wall, Derrida certainly thought not. He argued that in the ‘new world disorder’, ideologies like neo-liberalism were enmeshed with communism, haunted by the spectre of communisms yet to come. Is Derrida’s analysis still applicable to the post-9/11 world? And have new spectres appeared in our midst? Robert Eaglestone (@BobEaglestone) is Professor of Contemporary Literature and Thought at Royal Holloway, University of London. Simon Glendinning(@lonanglo) is Professor of European Philosophy, London School of Economics. Maja Zehfuss is Professor of International Politics, University of Manchester Danielle Sands (@DanielleCSands) is a Fellow at the Forum for Philosophy & Lecturer in Comparative Literature and Culture, Royal Holloway, University of London. This event is co-organised by the European Institute and the Forum for Philiosophy. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. The Forum for Philosophy (@ForumPhilosophy) is an educational charity that organises a full and varied programme of philosophy and interdisciplinary events in the UK. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #New WorldDisorders This event is part of the LSE Festival: New World (Dis)Orders running from Monday 25 February to Saturday 2 March 2019, with a series of events exploring how social science can tackle global problems. From time to time there are changes to event details so we strongly recommend that if you plan to attend this event you check back on this listing on the day of the event.Thu, 28 Feb 2019 18:00:00 GMT53 LSE Festival 2019 | How to Remain Sane in the Age of Populism [Audio]Elif Shafakhttp://www.tigerscanswim.com/newsAndMedia/videoAndAudio/channels/publicLecturesAndEvents/player.aspx?id=463200:57:34PD7261Speaker(s): Elif Shafak | Until not so long ago, some parts of the world—namely, the West— were thought to be solid, steady, stable. Other parts of the world—namely, the non-West— were thought to be liquid, not yet settled. Since 2016 it has become increasingly clear to citizens across the world that there are no solid and in fact, we are all living in liquid times. Fear, anger, anxiety, resentment… emotions guide and misguide politics. The more “informed” we are the less we know. The less we know the less we understand. And the less we understand the bigger our fears. How can we remain sane in the age of populism? Should we retreat into tribes of our own and try to feel more secure there; should we create new tribes, or should we, and can we, find a way beyond tribalism? Elif Shafak (@Elif_Safak) Elif Shafak is an award-winning British-Turkish novelist and the most widely read female author in Turkey. She writes in both Turkish and English, and has published seventeen books, eleven of which are novels. Her work has been translated into fifty languages. Shafak holds a PhD in political science and she has taught at various universities in Turkey, the US and the UK, including St Anne's College, Oxford University, where she is an honorary fellow. She is a member of Weforum Global Agenda Council on Creative Economy and a founding member of ECFR (European Council on Foreign Relations). An advocate for women's rights, LGBT rights and freedom of speech, Shafak is an inspiring public speaker and twice a TED Global speaker, each time receiving a standing ovation. Shafak contributes to major publications around the world and she has been awarded the title of Chevalier des Arts et des Lettres. In 2017 she was chosen by Politico as one of the twelve people who would make the world better. She has judged numerous literary prizes and is chairing the Wellcome Prize 2019. Jonathan White (@JonathanPJWhite) is Deputy Head of the European Institute and Professor in Politics at LSE. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #NewWorldDisorders This event is part of the LSE Festival: New World (Dis)Orders running from Monday 25 February to Saturday 2 March 2019, with a series of events exploring how social science can tackle global problems.Speaker(s): Elif Shafak | Until not so long ago, some parts of the world—namely, the West— were thought to be solid, steady, stable. Other parts of the world—namely, the non-West— were thought to be liquid, not yet settled. Since 2016 it has become increasingly clear to citizens across the world that there are no solid and in fact, we are all living in liquid times. Fear, anger, anxiety, resentment… emotions guide and misguide politics. The more “informed” we are the less we know. The less we know the less we understand. And the less we understand the bigger our fears. How can we remain sane in the age of populism? Should we retreat into tribes of our own and try to feel more secure there; should we create new tribes, or should we, and can we, find a way beyond tribalism? Elif Shafak (@Elif_Safak) Elif Shafak is an award-winning British-Turkish novelist and the most widely read female author in Turkey. She writes in both Turkish and English, and has published seventeen books, eleven of which are novels. Her work has been translated into fifty languages. Shafak holds a PhD in political science and she has taught at various universities in Turkey, the US and the UK, including St Anne's College, Oxford University, where she is an honorary fellow. She is a member of Weforum Global Agenda Council on Creative Economy and a founding member of ECFR (European Council on Foreign Relations). An advocate for women's rights, LGBT rights and freedom of speech, Shafak is an inspiring public speaker and twice a TED Global speaker, each time receiving a standing ovation. Shafak contributes to major publications around the world and she has been awarded the title of Chevalier des Arts et des Lettres. In 2017 she was chosen by Politico as one of the twelve people who would make the world better. She has judged numerous literary prizes and is chairing the Wellcome Prize 2019. Jonathan White (@JonathanPJWhite) is Deputy Head of the European Institute and Professor in Politics at LSE. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #NewWorldDisorders This event is part of the LSE Festival: New World (Dis)Orders running from Monday 25 February to Saturday 2 March 2019, with a series of events exploring how social science can tackle global problems.Wed, 27 Feb 2019 19:30:00 GMT54 LSE Festival 2019 | New Reconciliations: the two Koreas [Audio]Dr Jeong-Im Hyun, Dr Owen Miller, Professor Vladimir Tikhonovhttp://www.tigerscanswim.com/newsAndMedia/videoAndAudio/channels/publicLecturesAndEvents/player.aspx?id=463101:01:07PD7260Speaker(s): Dr Jeong-Im Hyun, Dr Owen Miller, Professor Vladimir Tikhonov | Since early 2018, the two Koreas on the Korean Peninsula, known to be the last remaining divided countries since the end of the Second World War, have begun the road to reconciliation. A series of summit visits have taken place and are expected to continue, together with various events and projects that are expected to increase the level of interaction in terms of economy, politics, culture and infrastructure. What does this thawing relationship mean for the future of the Koreas and of the world? This roundtable discussion lasting 75 minutes, involve three experts who have carried out long-term research on Korean affairs, and are expected to provide an opportunity to re-think the Korean reconciliation from a wide range of perspectives, from post-imperialism and state formation to urban development and infrastructure. The event is to ask: to what extent does the reconciliation of the two Koreas allow us to re-think a better future and a new world order with less confrontation? The discussions will be related to the implication of the Korean reconciliation for the regional/global economic development for the re-ordering of the neo-imperialist geopolitics, and for the sustainable future of world development in the context of heightened global insecurity. Jeong-Im Hyun is a Lecturer of Korean Studies at the Department of School of languages and Global Studies in the University of Central Lancashire. Her main research interests are social movement, political communication analysis, and socio-cultural dimension of Korean popular culture diffusion in Europe. Owen Miller initially studied East Asian history at SOAS as an undergraduate and subsequently lived in South Korea, where he studied Korean language at Yonsei University. He returned to SOAS in 2001 to study for an MA and then a PhD in Korean history, focusing on merchant guilds in late nineteenth century Seoul. Vladimir Tikhonov (Pak Noja) is a professor of Korean and East Asian studies at the Department of Culture Studies and Oriental Languages, Oslo University. His research focuses on the history of modern ideas in Korea. Hyun Bang Shin is Professor of Geography and Urban Studies in the Department of Geography and Environment at the London School of Economics and Political Science, and Director of the Saw Swee Hock Southeast Asia Centre. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #NewWorldDisorders This event is part of the LSE Festival: New World (Dis)Orders running from Monday 25 February to Saturday 2 March 2019, with a series of events exploring how social science can tackle global problems.Speaker(s): Dr Jeong-Im Hyun, Dr Owen Miller, Professor Vladimir Tikhonov | Since early 2018, the two Koreas on the Korean Peninsula, known to be the last remaining divided countries since the end of the Second World War, have begun the road to reconciliation. A series of summit visits have taken place and are expected to continue, together with various events and projects that are expected to increase the level of interaction in terms of economy, politics, culture and infrastructure. What does this thawing relationship mean for the future of the Koreas and of the world? This roundtable discussion lasting 75 minutes, involve three experts who have carried out long-term research on Korean affairs, and are expected to provide an opportunity to re-think the Korean reconciliation from a wide range of perspectives, from post-imperialism and state formation to urban development and infrastructure. The event is to ask: to what extent does the reconciliation of the two Koreas allow us to re-think a better future and a new world order with less confrontation? The discussions will be related to the implication of the Korean reconciliation for the regional/global economic development for the re-ordering of the neo-imperialist geopolitics, and for the sustainable future of world development in the context of heightened global insecurity. Jeong-Im Hyun is a Lecturer of Korean Studies at the Department of School of languages and Global Studies in the University of Central Lancashire. Her main research interests are social movement, political communication analysis, and socio-cultural dimension of Korean popular culture diffusion in Europe. Owen Miller initially studied East Asian history at SOAS as an undergraduate and subsequently lived in South Korea, where he studied Korean language at Yonsei University. He returned to SOAS in 2001 to study for an MA and then a PhD in Korean history, focusing on merchant guilds in late nineteenth century Seoul. Vladimir Tikhonov (Pak Noja) is a professor of Korean and East Asian studies at the Department of Culture Studies and Oriental Languages, Oslo University. His research focuses on the history of modern ideas in Korea. Hyun Bang Shin is Professor of Geography and Urban Studies in the Department of Geography and Environment at the London School of Economics and Political Science, and Director of the Saw Swee Hock Southeast Asia Centre. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #NewWorldDisorders This event is part of the LSE Festival: New World (Dis)Orders running from Monday 25 February to Saturday 2 March 2019, with a series of events exploring how social science can tackle global problems.Wed, 27 Feb 2019 19:30:00 GMT55 LSE Festival 2019 | Beyond Journeys: a dialogue with migrants and refugees [Audio]Allaa Barri, Bashar Farahat, Mohammad Ghannam, Sema Nassar, Bashir Zalghanehhttp://www.tigerscanswim.com/newsAndMedia/videoAndAudio/channels/publicLecturesAndEvents/player.aspx?id=463300:58:58PD7263Speaker(s): Allaa Barri, Bashar Farahat, Mohammad Ghannam, Sema Nassar, Bashir Zalghaneh | Today’s growing sense of ‘disorder’ is shaped by the current refugee and migrant crisis. Conceived as an open dialogue between the audience and migrants and refugees, this panel provides the audience with an opportunity to explore the real-life consequences of current geopolitical tensions. Allaa Barri is a Syrian refugee and Research Development and Communications Manager at Chatham House. Bashar Farahat is a Syrian medical doctor living as a refugee in London, currently undertaking a conversion course so he can practise medicine in Britain. Mohammad Ghannam is a Palestinian-Syrian refugee in France, a journalist and Communications Officer for Médecins Sans Frontières. Sema Nassar is a Syrian refugee and prominent human rights activist, based in London. Bashir Zalghaneh is a Syrian refugee, former child refugee in Calais, now living in London and learning English. Sandra Jovchelovitch is Professor of Social Psychology at the Department of Psychological and Behavioural Science, LSE. Curious to learn more, discuss, and get actively involved in the topic? Check out the variety of events during LSESU STAR Refugee Week on campus starting on the 4th of March. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #NewWorldDisorders This event is part of the LSE Festival: New World (Dis)Orders running from Monday 25 February to Saturday 2 March 2019, with a series of events exploring how social science can tackle global problems. This event is part of the LSE Festival: New World (Dis)Orders running from Monday 25 February to Saturday 2 March 2019, with a series of events exploring how social science can tackle global problems.Speaker(s): Allaa Barri, Bashar Farahat, Mohammad Ghannam, Sema Nassar, Bashir Zalghaneh | Today’s growing sense of ‘disorder’ is shaped by the current refugee and migrant crisis. Conceived as an open dialogue between the audience and migrants and refugees, this panel provides the audience with an opportunity to explore the real-life consequences of current geopolitical tensions. Allaa Barri is a Syrian refugee and Research Development and Communications Manager at Chatham House. Bashar Farahat is a Syrian medical doctor living as a refugee in London, currently undertaking a conversion course so he can practise medicine in Britain. Mohammad Ghannam is a Palestinian-Syrian refugee in France, a journalist and Communications Officer for Médecins Sans Frontières. Sema Nassar is a Syrian refugee and prominent human rights activist, based in London. Bashir Zalghaneh is a Syrian refugee, former child refugee in Calais, now living in London and learning English. Sandra Jovchelovitch is Professor of Social Psychology at the Department of Psychological and Behavioural Science, LSE. Curious to learn more, discuss, and get actively involved in the topic? Check out the variety of events during LSESU STAR Refugee Week on campus starting on the 4th of March. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #NewWorldDisorders This event is part of the LSE Festival: New World (Dis)Orders running from Monday 25 February to Saturday 2 March 2019, with a series of events exploring how social science can tackle global problems. This event is part of the LSE Festival: New World (Dis)Orders running from Monday 25 February to Saturday 2 March 2019, with a series of events exploring how social science can tackle global problems.Wed, 27 Feb 2019 18:00:00 GMT56 LSE Festival 2019 | Dangerous Scholarship: trolled and threatened for research and activism [Audio]Dr Bermal Aydin, Professor Sarah Banet-Weiser, Professor Meena Dhandahttp://www.tigerscanswim.com/newsAndMedia/videoAndAudio/channels/publicLecturesAndEvents/player.aspx?id=463000:53:43PD7259Speaker(s): Dr Bermal Aydin, Professor Sarah Banet-Weiser, Professor Meena Dhanda | The panel discusses how research about discrimination, misogyny, climate change or social inequity can call forth a violent ideological and physical backlash on and offline. Professor Sarah Banet-Weiser (@sbanetweiser) is Professor of Media and Communication and Head of the Department of Media and Communications. Professor Meena Dhanda is Professor of Philosophy and Cultural Politics at the University of Wolverhampton. Dr Bermal Aydin is a postdoctoral researcher in the Center for Study of Human Rights at LSE whose research interests include alternative media, precarity, authoritarianism, freedom of expression, populism, gender and film analysis. Dr Shakuntala Banaji is Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Studies at the Department of Media and Communications. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #NewWorldDisorders This event is part of the LSE Festival: New World (Dis)Orders running from Monday 25 February to Saturday 2 March 2019, with a series of events exploring how social science can tackle global problems.Speaker(s): Dr Bermal Aydin, Professor Sarah Banet-Weiser, Professor Meena Dhanda | The panel discusses how research about discrimination, misogyny, climate change or social inequity can call forth a violent ideological and physical backlash on and offline. Professor Sarah Banet-Weiser (@sbanetweiser) is Professor of Media and Communication and Head of the Department of Media and Communications. Professor Meena Dhanda is Professor of Philosophy and Cultural Politics at the University of Wolverhampton. Dr Bermal Aydin is a postdoctoral researcher in the Center for Study of Human Rights at LSE whose research interests include alternative media, precarity, authoritarianism, freedom of expression, populism, gender and film analysis. Dr Shakuntala Banaji is Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Studies at the Department of Media and Communications. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #NewWorldDisorders This event is part of the LSE Festival: New World (Dis)Orders running from Monday 25 February to Saturday 2 March 2019, with a series of events exploring how social science can tackle global problems.Wed, 27 Feb 2019 18:00:00 GMT57 LSE Festival 2019 | Innovation: a disruptive force for good? [Audio]Dr Juanita Gonzalez-Uribe, Geoff Mulgan, Emma Smith, Kartik Varmahttp://www.tigerscanswim.com/newsAndMedia/videoAndAudio/channels/publicLecturesAndEvents/player.aspx?id=464500:55:05PD7276Speaker(s): Dr Juanita Gonzalez-Uribe, Geoff Mulgan, Emma Smith, Kartik Varma | You see things; and you say "Why?" But I dream things that never were; and I say "Why not?" - George Bernard Shaw Join a panel of entrepreneurs and innovation experts to discuss how we can tackle the world's biggest problems in innovative ways to benefit society. We will consider questions including: What does innovation mean for social science? How we can innovate in socially responsible ways? Is innovation always to do with technology? How can we foster creativity and innovation? What does an innovative world look like? Juanita Gonzalez-Uribe is an Assistant Professor at the London School of Economics. Her research focuses on entrepreneurship, private equity and innovation. Her work has won several prizes including the Kauffman Dissertation Award (2012), the Coller Prize Award London (2013) and the Jaime Fernandez de Araoz Award (JFA, 2017). Emma Smith (@emmyagsmith) is the Co-Founder and Chief Operating Officer at Eversend, a blockchain-based e-wallet for Africa and its diaspora that can facilitate money transfers both on and offline. To date, Eversend has facilitated over 5.5 million dollars worth of transactions. Before Eversend, Emma has worked on enterprising and innovative solutions to complex development problems. She's been on the founding team of five startups. Working with the public and private sector, she has led and participated in projects on diverse topics such as refugees and forced migration, global health, and financial inclusion. Geoff Mulgan (@geoffmulgan) has been Chief Executive of Nesta since 2011. Nesta is the UK's innovation foundation and runs a wide range of activities in investment, practical innovation and research. Between 1997 and 2004 Geoff had various roles in the UK government including director of the Government's Strategy Unit and head of policy in the Prime Minister's office. From 2004 to 2011 Geoff was the first Chief Executive of The Young Foundation. He was the first director of the think-tank Demos; Chief Adviser to Gordon Brown MP and reporter on BBC TV and radio. Kartik Varma (@CorpusKV) is an entrepreneur and an investor. He is the co-founder of PropTiger.com, India's largest digital real estate services firm, and iTrust Financial Advisors, a web-based open architecture platform providing financial products and advice to the mass affluent market in India. Previously, Kartik worked at The Childrens Investment Fund (London), Ziff Brothers Investments (New York and London) and James D Wolfensohn, Inc. (New York). Julia Black is Professor of Law in the Department of Law at LSE. She joined the Law Department in 1994. She completed her first degree in Jurisprudence and her DPhil at Oxford University. Her primary research interest is regulation. She has had a British Academy - Leverhulme Trust Senior Research Fellowship, and been a Visiting Fellow at the University of Sydney and at All Souls College, Oxford, and in 2014 was the Sir Frank Holmes Visiting Professor in Public Policy at the University of Victoria, Wellington. Due to unforeseen circumstances Hannah Leach is unfortunately no longer able to speak at this event. We apologise for any inconvenience caused. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #NewWorldDisorders This event is part of the LSE Festival: New World (Dis)Orders running from Monday 25 February to Saturday 2 March 2019, with a series of events exploring how social science can tackle global problems.Speaker(s): Dr Juanita Gonzalez-Uribe, Geoff Mulgan, Emma Smith, Kartik Varma | You see things; and you say "Why?" But I dream things that never were; and I say "Why not?" - George Bernard Shaw Join a panel of entrepreneurs and innovation experts to discuss how we can tackle the world's biggest problems in innovative ways to benefit society. We will consider questions including: What does innovation mean for social science? How we can innovate in socially responsible ways? Is innovation always to do with technology? How can we foster creativity and innovation? What does an innovative world look like? Juanita Gonzalez-Uribe is an Assistant Professor at the London School of Economics. Her research focuses on entrepreneurship, private equity and innovation. Her work has won several prizes including the Kauffman Dissertation Award (2012), the Coller Prize Award London (2013) and the Jaime Fernandez de Araoz Award (JFA, 2017). Emma Smith (@emmyagsmith) is the Co-Founder and Chief Operating Officer at Eversend, a blockchain-based e-wallet for Africa and its diaspora that can facilitate money transfers both on and offline. To date, Eversend has facilitated over 5.5 million dollars worth of transactions. Before Eversend, Emma has worked on enterprising and innovative solutions to complex development problems. She's been on the founding team of five startups. Working with the public and private sector, she has led and participated in projects on diverse topics such as refugees and forced migration, global health, and financial inclusion. Geoff Mulgan (@geoffmulgan) has been Chief Executive of Nesta since 2011. Nesta is the UK's innovation foundation and runs a wide range of activities in investment, practical innovation and research. Between 1997 and 2004 Geoff had various roles in the UK government including director of the Government's Strategy Unit and head of policy in the Prime Minister's office. From 2004 to 2011 Geoff was the first Chief Executive of The Young Foundation. He was the first director of the think-tank Demos; Chief Adviser to Gordon Brown MP and reporter on BBC TV and radio. Kartik Varma (@CorpusKV) is an entrepreneur and an investor. He is the co-founder of PropTiger.com, India's largest digital real estate services firm, and iTrust Financial Advisors, a web-based open architecture platform providing financial products and advice to the mass affluent market in India. Previously, Kartik worked at The Childrens Investment Fund (London), Ziff Brothers Investments (New York and London) and James D Wolfensohn, Inc. (New York). Julia Black is Professor of Law in the Department of Law at LSE. She joined the Law Department in 1994. She completed her first degree in Jurisprudence and her DPhil at Oxford University. Her primary research interest is regulation. She has had a British Academy - Leverhulme Trust Senior Research Fellowship, and been a Visiting Fellow at the University of Sydney and at All Souls College, Oxford, and in 2014 was the Sir Frank Holmes Visiting Professor in Public Policy at the University of Victoria, Wellington. Due to unforeseen circumstances Hannah Leach is unfortunately no longer able to speak at this event. We apologise for any inconvenience caused. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #NewWorldDisorders This event is part of the LSE Festival: New World (Dis)Orders running from Monday 25 February to Saturday 2 March 2019, with a series of events exploring how social science can tackle global problems.Wed, 27 Feb 2019 18:00:00 GMT58 LSE Festival 2019 | Crisis of the Liberal World Order, or is the West in Decline - Again? [Audio]Professor G. John Ikenberry, Professor Mary Kaldorhttp://www.tigerscanswim.com/newsAndMedia/videoAndAudio/channels/publicLecturesAndEvents/player.aspx?id=463401:03:20PD7264Speaker(s): Professor G. John Ikenberry, Professor Mary Kaldor | The world famous theorist of international politics John Ikenberry of Princeton has for many years been insisting that the liberal world order created by the USA after WW2 has proved remarkably durable. Now, however, a series of major shifts in the world - the rise of China, the emergence of Russia as a spoiler power, the election of the very illiberal Donald Trump in the United States, and the more general populist backlash against globalisation- has placed the liberal order under immense strain. In this Roundtable Professor Ikenberry will be in conversation with leading LSE public intellectual Professor Mary Kaldor. Professor G. John Ikenberry is the Albert G. Milbank Professor of Politics and International Affairs at Princeton University in the Department of Politics and the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. He is also Co-Director of Princeton’s Center for International Security Studies. Professor Mary Kaldor is Director of the Conflict and Civil Society Research Unit at the Department of International Development, LSE. Michael Cox is Director of LSE IDEAS and Emeritus Professor of International Relations at LSE. The event is organised by LSE IDEAS. LSE IDEAS (@lseideas) is LSE's foreign policy think tank. We connect academic knowledge of diplomacy and strategy with the people who use it. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #NewWorldDisorders This event is part of the LSE Festival: New World (Dis)Orders running from Monday 25 February to Saturday 2 March 2019, with a series of events exploring how social science can tackle global problems.Speaker(s): Professor G. John Ikenberry, Professor Mary Kaldor | The world famous theorist of international politics John Ikenberry of Princeton has for many years been insisting that the liberal world order created by the USA after WW2 has proved remarkably durable. Now, however, a series of major shifts in the world - the rise of China, the emergence of Russia as a spoiler power, the election of the very illiberal Donald Trump in the United States, and the more general populist backlash against globalisation- has placed the liberal order under immense strain. In this Roundtable Professor Ikenberry will be in conversation with leading LSE public intellectual Professor Mary Kaldor. Professor G. John Ikenberry is the Albert G. Milbank Professor of Politics and International Affairs at Princeton University in the Department of Politics and the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. He is also Co-Director of Princeton’s Center for International Security Studies. Professor Mary Kaldor is Director of the Conflict and Civil Society Research Unit at the Department of International Development, LSE. Michael Cox is Director of LSE IDEAS and Emeritus Professor of International Relations at LSE. The event is organised by LSE IDEAS. LSE IDEAS (@lseideas) is LSE's foreign policy think tank. We connect academic knowledge of diplomacy and strategy with the people who use it. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #NewWorldDisorders This event is part of the LSE Festival: New World (Dis)Orders running from Monday 25 February to Saturday 2 March 2019, with a series of events exploring how social science can tackle global problems.Wed, 27 Feb 2019 14:00:00 GMT59 LSE Festival 2019 | A Marketplace for World Order [Audio]Professor Danny Quahhttp://www.tigerscanswim.com/newsAndMedia/videoAndAudio/channels/publicLecturesAndEvents/player.aspx?id=465901:15:30PD7295Speaker(s): Professor Danny Quah | For nearly a century, America has provided the world a simple narrative: "If you’re with us, you get international rule of law. If not, you have to deal with arbitrary exercise of power." Obviously, to most nations the latter proposition is untenable. Only under a multilateral rules-based system can lesser states stand toe to toe and resolve disputes on equal footing with great powers: In this view the right choice - an American-centered world order - is clear. But both America's own international conduct and academic scholarship suggest the increasing hollowness of this narrative. What forces will now shape the international system? Is disorder the only logical outcome with the breakdown of our current world order? This lecture suggests how an economic marketplace model for great power competition can help answer these questions, and guide thinking for constructing a world order that works for all the international community. Danny Quah (@DannyQuah ) is Li Ka Shing Professor in Economics and Dean at the Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy, National University of Singapore. His research interests include income inequality, economic growth, and international economic relations. Quah's current research takes an economic approach to world order - with focus on global power shift and the rise of the east, and alternative models of global power relations. Quah is Commissioner on the Spence-Stiglitz Commission on Global Economic Transformation: Member, Executive Committee, International Economic Association: and Senior Fellow, Asian Bureau of Finance and Economics Research. Michael Cox is Director of LSE IDEAS and Emeritus Professor of International Relations at LSE. In addition, he is currently working on a history of LSE. He helped establish the Cold War Studies Centre in 2004 and expand it into IDEAS, a foreign policy centre based at the LSE which aims to bring the academic and policy words together, in 2008. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #NewWorldDisorders This event is part of the LSE Festival: New World (Dis)Orders running from Monday 25 February to Saturday 2 March 2019, with a series of events exploring how social science can tackle global problems.Speaker(s): Professor Danny Quah | For nearly a century, America has provided the world a simple narrative: "If you’re with us, you get international rule of law. If not, you have to deal with arbitrary exercise of power." Obviously, to most nations the latter proposition is untenable. Only under a multilateral rules-based system can lesser states stand toe to toe and resolve disputes on equal footing with great powers: In this view the right choice - an American-centered world order - is clear. But both America's own international conduct and academic scholarship suggest the increasing hollowness of this narrative. What forces will now shape the international system? Is disorder the only logical outcome with the breakdown of our current world order? This lecture suggests how an economic marketplace model for great power competition can help answer these questions, and guide thinking for constructing a world order that works for all the international community. Danny Quah (@DannyQuah ) is Li Ka Shing Professor in Economics and Dean at the Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy, National University of Singapore. His research interests include income inequality, economic growth, and international economic relations. Quah's current research takes an economic approach to world order - with focus on global power shift and the rise of the east, and alternative models of global power relations. Quah is Commissioner on the Spence-Stiglitz Commission on Global Economic Transformation: Member, Executive Committee, International Economic Association: and Senior Fellow, Asian Bureau of Finance and Economics Research. Michael Cox is Director of LSE IDEAS and Emeritus Professor of International Relations at LSE. In addition, he is currently working on a history of LSE. He helped establish the Cold War Studies Centre in 2004 and expand it into IDEAS, a foreign policy centre based at the LSE which aims to bring the academic and policy words together, in 2008. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #NewWorldDisorders This event is part of the LSE Festival: New World (Dis)Orders running from Monday 25 February to Saturday 2 March 2019, with a series of events exploring how social science can tackle global problems.Tue, 26 Feb 2019 19:30:00 GMT60 LSE Festival 2019 | Are We Heading Towards a Digital Dystopia? [Audio]Sam Byers, Dr Orla Lynskey, Dr Alison Powellhttp://www.tigerscanswim.com/newsAndMedia/videoAndAudio/channels/publicLecturesAndEvents/player.aspx?id=462901:05:20PD7257Speaker(s): Sam Byers, Dr Orla Lynskey, Dr Alison Powell | As technology and media continue to change our society at a rapid rate, what are the implications for our privacy, democracy and role as citizens? Sam Byers (@byers90) is the author of Idiopathy (2013) and Perfidious Albion (2018). His work has been translated into ten languages and his writing has appeared in Granta, The New York Times, The Spectator, and The Times Literary Supplement. Idiopathy was included on the Waterstones 11 list of debut novels to watch out for; shortlisted for the Costa First Novel Prize and the Desmond Elliot Prize; and won a Betty Trask Award. Dr Alison Powell (@a_b_powell) is Assistant Professor in the Department of Media and Communications at LSE, where she was inaugural programme director for the MSc Media and Communications (Data and Society). She researches how people’s values influence the way technology is built, and how technological systems in turn change the way we work and live together. Dr Orla Lynskey (@lynskeyo) is an Associate Professor and joined LSE Law in September 2012. She teaches and conducts research in the areas of data protection, technology regulation, digital rights and EU law. She holds an LLB (Law and French) from Trinity College Dublin, an LLM in EU Law from the College of Europe (Bruges) and a PhD from the University of Cambridge. Professor Charlie Beckett (@CharlieBeckett) is the founding director of Polis, the think-tank for research and debate around international journalism and society in the Department of Media and Communications at LSE Charlie is also director of the Media Policy Project and Lead Commissioner for the LSE Truth, Trust & Technology Commission (T3). This event is organsied by the Department of Media and Communications (@MediaLSE), a world-leading centre for education and research in communication and media studies at the heart of LSE’s academic community in central London. The LSE Truth, Trust and Technology (T3) Commission deals with the crisis in public information. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #NewWorldDisorders This event is part of the LSE Festival: New World (Dis)Orders running from Monday 25 February to Saturday 2 March 2019, with a series of events exploring how social science can tackle global problems. The full programme will be online in January 2019.Speaker(s): Sam Byers, Dr Orla Lynskey, Dr Alison Powell | As technology and media continue to change our society at a rapid rate, what are the implications for our privacy, democracy and role as citizens? Sam Byers (@byers90) is the author of Idiopathy (2013) and Perfidious Albion (2018). His work has been translated into ten languages and his writing has appeared in Granta, The New York Times, The Spectator, and The Times Literary Supplement. Idiopathy was included on the Waterstones 11 list of debut novels to watch out for; shortlisted for the Costa First Novel Prize and the Desmond Elliot Prize; and won a Betty Trask Award. Dr Alison Powell (@a_b_powell) is Assistant Professor in the Department of Media and Communications at LSE, where she was inaugural programme director for the MSc Media and Communications (Data and Society). She researches how people’s values influence the way technology is built, and how technological systems in turn change the way we work and live together. Dr Orla Lynskey (@lynskeyo) is an Associate Professor and joined LSE Law in September 2012. She teaches and conducts research in the areas of data protection, technology regulation, digital rights and EU law. She holds an LLB (Law and French) from Trinity College Dublin, an LLM in EU Law from the College of Europe (Bruges) and a PhD from the University of Cambridge. Professor Charlie Beckett (@CharlieBeckett) is the founding director of Polis, the think-tank for research and debate around international journalism and society in the Department of Media and Communications at LSE Charlie is also director of the Media Policy Project and Lead Commissioner for the LSE Truth, Trust & Technology Commission (T3). This event is organsied by the Department of Media and Communications (@MediaLSE), a world-leading centre for education and research in communication and media studies at the heart of LSE’s academic community in central London. The LSE Truth, Trust and Technology (T3) Commission deals with the crisis in public information. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #NewWorldDisorders This event is part of the LSE Festival: New World (Dis)Orders running from Monday 25 February to Saturday 2 March 2019, with a series of events exploring how social science can tackle global problems. The full programme will be online in January 2019.Tue, 26 Feb 2019 19:00:00 GMT61 LSE Festival 2019 | A Populist Wave? Unity and Division Among Europe's New Parties [Audio]Dr Alexandru Filip, Professor Sara Hobolt, Dr Benjamin Martillhttp://www.tigerscanswim.com/newsAndMedia/videoAndAudio/channels/publicLecturesAndEvents/player.aspx?id=462700:59:02PD7255Speaker(s): Dr Alexandru Filip, Professor Sara Hobolt, Dr Benjamin Martill | The recent wave of populist parties and politicians throughout Europe and the world has been portrayed as a monolithic phenomenon that transcends national borders. On the right and on the left, populists have been portrayed as polarising forces that reinforce existing divisions in society and pull each side further from the centre. But is this the case? This event explores two counterintuitive arguments about Europe’s populist parties. First, that populist parties may find more in common with traditional parties in their home countries than with their counterparts in other European contexts; second, that populist parties on the left and the right have more in common with each other than with the traditional parties they separated from. Dr Alexandru Filip (@AlexFilip_87) is a Dahrendorf Forum Post-Doctoral Fellow based at the Hertie School of Governance in Berlin. Sara Hobolt (@sarahobolt) is Sutherland Chair in European Institutions and professor in the Department of Government and the European Institute at LSE. Dr Benjamin Martill is a Dahrendorf Forum Post-Doctoral Fellow based at the London School of Economics. Dr Rosa Balfour (@RosaBalfour) is a Senior Transatlantic Fellow at the German Marshall Fund and Associate Fellow at LSE IDEAS. This event is co-organised by the Dahrendorf Forum at LSE IDEAS. The Dahrendorf Forum (@DahrendorfForum) is a joint initiative between the LSE and the Hertie School of Governance, funded by the Mercator Stiftung. LSE IDEAS (@lseideas) is LSE's foreign policy think tank. We connect academic knowledge of diplomacy and strategy with the people who use it. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #NewWorldDisorders This event is part of the LSE Festival: New World (Dis)Orders running from Monday 25 February to Saturday 2 March 2019, with a series of events exploring how social science can tackle global problems.Speaker(s): Dr Alexandru Filip, Professor Sara Hobolt, Dr Benjamin Martill | The recent wave of populist parties and politicians throughout Europe and the world has been portrayed as a monolithic phenomenon that transcends national borders. On the right and on the left, populists have been portrayed as polarising forces that reinforce existing divisions in society and pull each side further from the centre. But is this the case? This event explores two counterintuitive arguments about Europe’s populist parties. First, that populist parties may find more in common with traditional parties in their home countries than with their counterparts in other European contexts; second, that populist parties on the left and the right have more in common with each other than with the traditional parties they separated from. Dr Alexandru Filip (@AlexFilip_87) is a Dahrendorf Forum Post-Doctoral Fellow based at the Hertie School of Governance in Berlin. Sara Hobolt (@sarahobolt) is Sutherland Chair in European Institutions and professor in the Department of Government and the European Institute at LSE. Dr Benjamin Martill is a Dahrendorf Forum Post-Doctoral Fellow based at the London School of Economics. Dr Rosa Balfour (@RosaBalfour) is a Senior Transatlantic Fellow at the German Marshall Fund and Associate Fellow at LSE IDEAS. This event is co-organised by the Dahrendorf Forum at LSE IDEAS. The Dahrendorf Forum (@DahrendorfForum) is a joint initiative between the LSE and the Hertie School of Governance, funded by the Mercator Stiftung. LSE IDEAS (@lseideas) is LSE's foreign policy think tank. We connect academic knowledge of diplomacy and strategy with the people who use it. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #NewWorldDisorders This event is part of the LSE Festival: New World (Dis)Orders running from Monday 25 February to Saturday 2 March 2019, with a series of events exploring how social science can tackle global problems.Tue, 26 Feb 2019 18:00:00 GMT62 LSE Festival 2019 | The Drugs Aren't Working! Confronting the Crisis of Superbugs [Audio]Michael Anderson, Dr Mathias Koenig-Archibugi, Ken Shadlen, Catherine Wilkoszhttp://www.tigerscanswim.com/newsAndMedia/videoAndAudio/channels/publicLecturesAndEvents/player.aspx?id=462800:56:57PD7256Speaker(s): Michael Anderson, Dr Mathias Koenig-Archibugi, Ken Shadlen, Catherine Wilkosz | Growing resistance to antibiotics is one of the most significant current threats to global public health. Estimates suggest that in the European Union and the United States alone infections from multidrug resistant bacteria cause around 50,000 deaths a year, with substantial economic burdens associated with these infections. These figures will likely worsen, in the absence of new antibiotics to replace those with declining effectiveness. Existing systems of global health governance and drug development need to be reconfigured in order to respond to new threats. Coordinated international action is needed to address an impending global crisis – but how best to mobilise divergent private and public sector interests and forestall pending disorder? The interdisciplinary panel sitting across International Development, Health Policy, Government and International Relations will each address the challenge of growing resistance to antibiotics, providing a solution from their disciplinary viewpoint with questions and comments submitted in the days leading up to the event fed into the discussion. Michael Anderson is a Research Officer in Health Policy at the Department of Health Policy, London School of Economics and Political Science, and a Medical Doctor undertaking General Practice specialty training. Mathias Koenig-Archibugi is Associate Professor of Global Politics at the Department of Government. He joined the LSE in 2000 and is currently Senior Lecturer in Global Politics. After completing his secondary and undergraduate education in Rome, Italy, he received his PhD in Political Science from the University of Florence (2000). Ken Shadlen is Professor of Development Studies in the Department of International Development. Ken works on the comparative and international political economy of development, with a focus on understanding variation in national policy responses to changing global rules. Catherine Wilkosz is a nurse from Ann Arbor, Michigan who recieved her BSN from Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio. She worked primarily in intraoperative orthopaedic trauma surgery before pursuing her masters in Global Health Policy at LSE. Ernestina Coast (@LSE_ID ) is Professor of Health and International Development at the Department of International Development. Ernestina’s research is multidisciplinary and positioned at an intersection of social science approaches including health, gender and development. As a social scientist with training in demography and anthropology, her research uses mixed methods (quantitative and qualitative) to understand the inter-relationships between social context and health-related behaviours, with a focus on sexual and reproductive health. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #NewWorldDisorders This event is part of the LSE Festival: New World (Dis)Orders running from Monday 25 February to Saturday 2 March 2019, with a series of events exploring how social science can tackle global problems.Speaker(s): Michael Anderson, Dr Mathias Koenig-Archibugi, Ken Shadlen, Catherine Wilkosz | Growing resistance to antibiotics is one of the most significant current threats to global public health. Estimates suggest that in the European Union and the United States alone infections from multidrug resistant bacteria cause around 50,000 deaths a year, with substantial economic burdens associated with these infections. These figures will likely worsen, in the absence of new antibiotics to replace those with declining effectiveness. Existing systems of global health governance and drug development need to be reconfigured in order to respond to new threats. Coordinated international action is needed to address an impending global crisis – but how best to mobilise divergent private and public sector interests and forestall pending disorder? The interdisciplinary panel sitting across International Development, Health Policy, Government and International Relations will each address the challenge of growing resistance to antibiotics, providing a solution from their disciplinary viewpoint with questions and comments submitted in the days leading up to the event fed into the discussion. Michael Anderson is a Research Officer in Health Policy at the Department of Health Policy, London School of Economics and Political Science, and a Medical Doctor undertaking General Practice specialty training. Mathias Koenig-Archibugi is Associate Professor of Global Politics at the Department of Government. He joined the LSE in 2000 and is currently Senior Lecturer in Global Politics. After completing his secondary and undergraduate education in Rome, Italy, he received his PhD in Political Science from the University of Florence (2000). Ken Shadlen is Professor of Development Studies in the Department of International Development. Ken works on the comparative and international political economy of development, with a focus on understanding variation in national policy responses to changing global rules. Catherine Wilkosz is a nurse from Ann Arbor, Michigan who recieved her BSN from Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio. She worked primarily in intraoperative orthopaedic trauma surgery before pursuing her masters in Global Health Policy at LSE. Ernestina Coast (@LSE_ID ) is Professor of Health and International Development at the Department of International Development. Ernestina’s research is multidisciplinary and positioned at an intersection of social science approaches including health, gender and development. As a social scientist with training in demography and anthropology, her research uses mixed methods (quantitative and qualitative) to understand the inter-relationships between social context and health-related behaviours, with a focus on sexual and reproductive health. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #NewWorldDisorders This event is part of the LSE Festival: New World (Dis)Orders running from Monday 25 February to Saturday 2 March 2019, with a series of events exploring how social science can tackle global problems.Tue, 26 Feb 2019 18:00:00 GMT63 LSE Festival 2019 | Whatever Happened to the Revolution? LSE in the 60s [Audio]Professor Michael Coxhttp://www.tigerscanswim.com/newsAndMedia/videoAndAudio/channels/publicLecturesAndEvents/player.aspx?id=462601:10:30PD7254Speaker(s): Professor Michael Cox | One British university above all others came to be associated with student rebellion in the 1960s - the LSE - later referred by one of the original rebels as that 'utopia at the end of the Kingsway rainbow - for a period'. But why the LSE? What did the students hope to achieve? And what legacy did they leave behind? Michael Cox is Director of LSE IDEAS and Emeritus Professor of International Relations at LSE. In addition, he is currently working on a history of LSE. He helped establish the Cold War Studies Centre in 2004 and expand it into IDEAS, a foreign policy centre based at the LSE which aims to bring the academic and policy words together, in 2008. Since joining the LSE he has also acted as Academic Director of both the LSE-PKU Summer School and of the Executive Summer School. Sue Donnelly joined LSE in 1989 and as LSE Archivist is responsible for the development of LSE’s institutional archive and raising awareness of the School